Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

How can I use modulo operator (%) in calculation of numbers for javascript projects?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by KooiInc, andyb, flavian, Juhana, Fabien Ménager May 12 '13 at 8:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
oh, I didn't see that. Can I delete this question? –  Ziyaddin Sadigov May 12 '13 at 8:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 35 down vote accepted

It's the remainder operator and is used to get the remainder after integer division. Lots of languages have it. For example:

10 % 3 // = 1 ; because 3 * 3 gets you 9, and 10 - 9 is 1.

Apparently it is not the same as the modulo operator entirely.

share|improve this answer
1  
can you explain 10 % 3 = 1? –  Ziyaddin Sadigov May 12 '13 at 8:36
5  
You can fit 3 exactly 3 times in 9. If you would add 3 one more time to 9, you would end up with 12. But you were dividing 10, so instead you say it's 3 times 9 with the remainder being 1. That's what modulo gets you. –  MDeSchaepmeester May 12 '13 at 8:38
1  
Thanks! I understood. –  Ziyaddin Sadigov May 12 '13 at 8:39
1  
I think it is better to explain it this way: Modulo is the difference left when dividing a value. You can use this to calculate listing lists with items, for example: 10 % 10 gives you 0. When it is 0 you know there a 10 items in a list. For example 20 % 10 gives you the same value, 0, another 10 items in a list...... –  Erwinus Mar 5 at 6:43
    
There is no "integer division" operator in JS AFAIK; 10 / 3 will result in 3.333.... You need to truncate the fraction, for instance by using Math.floor(). –  Lucero Aug 20 at 17:02

That would be the modulo operator, which produces the remainder of the division of two numbers.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.