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The class template ::std::numeric_limits<T> may only be instantiated for types T, which can be the return value of functions, since it always defines member functions like static constexpr T min() noexcept { return T(); } (see http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/limits/numeric_limits/ for more information of the non-specialised versions in c++03 or c++11).

If T is i.e. int[2] the instantiation will immediately lead to a compile time error, since int[2] cannot be the return value of a function.

Wrapping ::std::numeric_limits with a safe version is easy - if a way to determine if it is safe to instantiate ::std::numeric_limits is known. This is necessary, since the problematic functions should be accessible if possible.

The obvious (and obviously wrong) way of testing ::std::numeric_limits<T>::is_specialised does not work since it requires instantiation of the problematic class template.

Is there a way to test for safety of instantiation, preferably without enumerating all known bad types? Maybe even a general technique to determine if any class template instantiation is safe?

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1  
What's wrong with std::is_arithmetic? An example of usage can be found here –  Tom Knapen May 12 '13 at 9:20
    
@TomKnapen, why not post as an answer? –  hmjd May 12 '13 at 9:23
    
@hmjd Because I'm never sure whether or not my answer is correct (sometimes I misinterpret a question and post a totally unrelated comment/answer). –  Tom Knapen May 12 '13 at 9:25
    
@TomKnapen A very concise solution, that works perfectly if nobody specialises numeric_limits without specialising is_arithmetic, which leads to a kind of type enumeration (of safe types). –  gha.st May 12 '13 at 9:45
    
@TomKnapen This doesn't catch custom types with a specialized std::numeric_limits, which is a perfectly common technique. –  Christian Rau May 13 '13 at 9:25

3 Answers 3

Concerning the type trait that decides whether a type can be returned for a function, here is how I would go about it:

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T, typename = void>
struct can_be_returned_from_function : std::false_type { };

template<typename T>
struct can_be_returned_from_function<T,
    typename std::enable_if<!std::is_abstract<T>::value,
    decltype(std::declval<T()>(), (void)0)>::type>
    : std::true_type { };

On the other hand, as suggested by Tom Knapen in the comments, you may want to use the std::is_arithmetic standard type trait to determine whether you can specialize numeric_limits for a certain type.

Per paragraph 18.3.2.1/2 of the C++11 Standard on the numeric_limits class template, in fact:

Specializations shall be provided for each arithmetic type, both floating point and integer, including bool. The member is_specialized shall be true for all such specializations of numeric_limits.

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This will also report true for anything that's copyable. I'm not sure that this is what OP wants. –  jrok May 12 '13 at 9:24
    
@jrok: Agreed, I edited the answer. –  Andy Prowl May 12 '13 at 9:25
    
Since I will not be calling the problematic functions, returning true for not copy constructible (and not default constructible) types is actually OK. In fact, I am unaware of any type other than arrays that cause this problem. However, I was wondering if there was a way of testing if the template is instantiable other than thinking about which kind of types (e.g. types that can be returned from functions) lead to problems with the specific template. –  gha.st May 12 '13 at 9:39
    
@dionadar: Honestly, I think you may just use is_arithmetic, it's simpler, clear about its intent, and supported by standard quotes (see the answer) –  Andy Prowl May 12 '13 at 9:43
    
Sometimes it makes sense to overload numeric_limits (e.g. this user stackoverflow.com/questions/1615197/… did exactly that). Using is_arithmetic would require any such case to also specialise is_arithmetic to true (which, as I read the definition would probably be wrong to do). Since I have to deal with old code from C++03 code bases, where is_arithmetic does not exist, this point becomes moot. –  gha.st May 12 '13 at 9:53

std::is_convertible<T, T>::value will tell you if a type can be returned from a function.

is_convertible<T1, T2> is defined in terms of a function returning a T2 converted from an expression of type T1.

#include <limits>
#include <type_traits>

struct Incomplete;
struct Abstract { virtual void f() = 0; };

template<typename T>
  using is_numeric_limits_safe = std::is_convertible<T, T>;

int main()
{
  static_assert(!is_numeric_limits_safe<Incomplete>::value, "Incomplete");
  static_assert(!is_numeric_limits_safe<Abstract>::value,   "Abstract");
  static_assert(!is_numeric_limits_safe<int[2]>::value,     "int[2]");
}

This might not be exactly what you want, because it is safe to instantiate std::numeric_limits<Incomplete> as long as you don't call any of the functions that return by value. It's not possible to instantiate std::numeric_limits<int[2]> though.

Here's a better test (using SFINAE) which gives is_numeric_limits_safe<Incomplete>::value==true

template<typename T>
class is_numeric_limits_unsafe
{
  struct mu { };

  template<typename U>
    static U test(int);

  template<typename U>
    static mu test(...);

public:
    typedef std::is_same<decltype(test<T>(0)), mu> type;
};

template<typename T>
struct is_numeric_limits_safe
: std::integral_constant<bool, !is_numeric_limits_unsafe<T>::type::value>
{ };
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I really like your first solution, it captures the heart of the problem very nicely. However, I cannot reproduce your second solution, it seems to cause compilation errors on abstract or incemplete types: ideone.com/OkmCBG –  gha.st May 12 '13 at 20:01
    
That looks like a G++ 4.7 bug, it compiles OK with G++ 4.9 or with Clang –  Jonathan Wakely May 12 '13 at 20:20
    
... and compiles OK with G++ 4.8.1 –  Jonathan Wakely May 12 '13 at 23:53
    
Tested both versions with icc 1310 and MSVC 1700 (VS2012): Version 1 yields incorrect results in both cases (icc: always true, msvc: true except for functions and incomplete classes); Version 2 yields correct results, but causes icc to emit a warning. –  gha.st May 13 '13 at 6:09
    
Version 2 might depend on the compiler implementing open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2011/n3276.pdf ... not sure though –  Jonathan Wakely May 13 '13 at 12:06
up vote 3 down vote accepted

C++11 solutions

Since T only appears as the return type of static member functions in the declarations of the unspecialised ::std::numeric_limits<T> (see C++03 18.2.1.1 and C++11 18.3.2.3), it is enough for this specific problem to ensure that doing so is declaration-safe.

The reason this leads to a compile time error is, that the use of a template-argument may not give rise to an ill-formed construct in the instantiation of the template specialization (C++03 14.3/6, C++11 14.3/6).

For C++11 enabled projects, Andy Prowl's can_be_returned_from_function solution works in all relevant cases: http://ideone.com/SZB2bj , but it is not easily portable to a C++03 environment. It causes an error in when instantiated with an incomplete type ( http://ideone.com/k4Y25z ). The proposed solution will accept incomplete classes instead of causing an error. The current Microsoft compiler (msvc 1700 / VS2012) seems to dislike this solution and fail to compile.

Jonathan Wakely proposed a solution that works by utilizing std::is_convertible<T, T> to determine if T can be the return value of a function. This also eliminates incomplete classes, and is easy to show correct (it is defined in C++11 to do exactly what we want). Execution shows that all cases (arrays, arrays of undefined length, functions, abstract classes) which are known to be problematic are correctly recognized. As a bonus, it also correctly recognizes incomplete classes, which are not allowed as parameters to numeric_limits by the standards (see below), although they seem to cause no problems in practice, as long as no problematic functions are actually called. Test execution: http://ideone.com/zolXpp . Some current compilers (icc 1310 and msvc 1700, which is VS2012's compiler) generate incorrect results with this method.

Tom Knapen's is_arithmetic solution is a very concise C++11 solution, but requires the implementer of a type that specialises numeric_limits to also specialise is_arithmetic. Alternatively, a type that in its base case inherits from is_arithmetic (this type might be called numeric_limits_is_specialised) might be specialised in those cases, since specialising is_abstract might not be semantically correct (e.g. a type that does not specify all basic arithmetic operators, but still is a valid integer-like type).
This whitelisting approach ensures that even incomplete types are handled correctly, unless someone maliciously tries to force compilation errors.

Caveat

As shown by the mixed results, C++11 support remains spotty, even with current compilers, so your mileage with these solutions may vary. A C++03 solution will benefit from more consistent results and the ability to be used in projects that do not wish to switch to C++11.

Towards a robust C++03 solution

Paragraph C++11 8.3.5/8 lists the restrictions for return values:

If the type of a parameter includes a type of the form "pointer to array of unknown bound of T" or "reference to array of unknown bound of T", the program is ill-formed. Functions shall not have a return type of type array or function, although they may have a return type of type pointer or reference to such things. There shall be no arrays of functions, although there can be arrays of pointers to functions.

and goes on in paragraph C++11 8.3.5/9:

Types shall not be defined in return or parameter types. The type of a parameter or the return type for a function definition shall not be an incomplete class type (possibly cv-qualified) unless the function definition is nested within the member-specification for that class (including definitions in nested classes defined within the class).

Which is pretty much the same as paragraph C++03 8.3.5/6:

If the type of a parameter includes a type of the form "pointer to array of unknown bound of T" or "reference to array of unknown bound of T", the program is ill-formed. Functions shall not have a return type of type array or function, although they may have a return type of type pointer or reference to such things. There shall be no arrays of functions, although there can be arrays of pointers to functions. Types shall not be defined in return or parameter types. The type of a parameter or the return type for a function definition shall not be an incomplete class type (possibly cv-qualified) unless the function definition is nested within the member-specification for that class (including definitions in nested classes defined within the class).

Another kind of problematic types is mentioned identically in C++11 10.4/3 and C++03 10.4/3:

An abstract class shall not be used as a parameter type, as a function return type, or as the type of an explicit conversion. [...]

The problematic functions are not nested within an incomplete class type (except of ::std::numeric_limits<T>, which cannot be their T), so we have four kinds of problematic values of T: Arrays, functions, incomplete class types and abstract class types.

Array Types

template<typename T> struct is_array
{ static const bool value = false; };

template<typename T> struct is_array<T[]>
{ static const bool value = true; };

template<typename T, size_t n> struct is_array<T[n]>
{ static const bool value = true; };

detects the simple case of T being an array type.

Incomplete Class Types

Incomplete class types interestingly do not lead to a compilation error just from instantiation, which means either the tested implementations are more forgiving than the standard, or I am missing something.

C++03 example: http://ideone.com/qZUa1N C++11 example: http://ideone.com/MkA0Gr

Since I cannot come up with a proper way to detect incomplete types, and even the standard specifies (C++03 17.4.3.6/2 item 5)

In particular, the effects are undefined in the following cases: [...] if an incomplete type (3.9) is used as a template argument when instantiating a template component.

Adding only the following special allowance in C++11 (17.6.4.8/2):

[...] unless specifically allowed for that component

it seems safe to assume that anybody passing incomplete types as template parameters are on their own.

A complete list of the cases where C++11 allows incomplete type parameters is quite short:

  • declval
  • unique_ptr
  • default_delete (C++11 20.7.1.1.1/1: "The class template default_delete serves as the default deleter (destruction policy) for the class template unique_ptr."
  • shared_ptr
  • weak_ptr
  • enable_shared_from_this

Abstract Class & Function Types

Detecting functions is a bit more work than in C++11, since we do not have variadic templates in C++03. However, the above quotes on functions already contain the hint we need; functions may not be elements of arrays.

Paragraph C++11 8.3.4\1 contains the sentence

T is called the array element type; this type shall not be a reference type, the (possibly cv qualified) type void, a function type or an abstract class type.

which is also verbatim in paragraph C++03 8.3.4\1 and will allow us to test if a type is a function type. Detecting (cv) void and reference types is simple:

template<typename T> struct is_reference
{ static const bool value = false; };

template<typename T> struct is_reference<T&>
{ static const bool value = true; };

template<typename T> struct is_void
{ static const bool value = false; };

template<> struct is_void<void>
{ static const bool value = true; };

template<> struct is_void<void const>
{ static const bool value = true; };

template<> struct is_void<void volatile>
{ static const bool value = true; };

template<> struct is_void<void const volatile>
{ static const bool value = true; };

Using this, it is simple to write a meta function for abstract class types and functions:

template<typename T>
class is_abstract_class_or_function
{
    typedef char (&Two)[2];
    template<typename U> static char test(U(*)[1]);
    template<typename U> static Two test(...);

public:
    static const bool value =
        !is_reference<T>::value &&
        !is_void<T>::value &&
        (sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(Two));
};

Note that the following meta function may be used to distinguish between the two, should one wish to make a distinct is_function and is_abstract_class

template<typename T>
class is_class
{
    typedef char (&Two)[2];
    template<typename U> static char test(int (U::*));
    template<typename U> static Two test(...);

public:
    static const bool value = (sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(char));
};

Solution

Combining all of the previous work, we can construct the is_returnable meta function:

template<typename T> struct is_returnable
{ static const bool value = !is_array<T>::value && !is_abstract_class_or_function<T>::value; };

Execution for C++03 (gcc 4.3.2): http://ideone.com/thuqXY
Execution for C++03 (gcc 4.7.2): http://ideone.com/OR4Swf Execution for C++11 (gcc 4.7.2): http://ideone.com/zIu7GJ

As expected, all test cases except for the incomplete class yield the correct answer.

In addition to the above test runs, this version is tested (with the exact same test program) to yield the same results w/o warnings or errors on:

  • MSVC 1700 (VS2012 with and w/o XP profile), 1600 (VS2010), 1500 (VS2008)
  • ICC Win 1310
  • GCC (C++03 and C++11/C++0x mode) 4.4.7, 4.6.4, 4.8.0 and a 4.9 snapshot

Restrictions for either case

Note that, while this approach in either version works for any numeric_limits implementation that does not extend upon the implementation shown in the standard, it is by no means a solution to the general problem, and in fact may theoretically lead to problems with weird but standard compliant implementations (e.g. ones which add private members).

Incomplete classes remain a problem, but it seems silly to require higher robustness goals than the standard library itself.

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Your testcase for incomplete classes does not error out because it does not instantiate the member function definitions right away. Only the declarations are instantiated, which allow incomplete class types. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 12 '13 at 19:25
    
The wording in the standard seems very similar for the incomplete class type and e.g. array types ("shall not have" vs. "shall not be")? –  gha.st May 12 '13 at 19:38
    
You have missed my point. One of the cases applies only to nondefining declarations. And the other cases apply to any sort of function declaration. incomplete f (); is entirely fine. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 12 '13 at 19:49
    
Maybe I got my vocabs wrong, but are static constexpr T min() noexcept { return T(); } (version from the standard) and static _Ty (min)() _THROW0() { return (_Ty(0)); } (actual version from my compiler's headers) not definitions, since either version includes a body? –  gha.st May 12 '13 at 20:06
    
Yes, both are definitions. But if you strip away the part that makes them definitions (the bodies), then you end up with the part that is instantiated right away. Array types then still cause an error. While incomplete class types do not. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 12 '13 at 20:11

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