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I was handling yet another KeyDown event in a user control when I wondered if it existed a library for typing fluent code for handling event like

editor.When(Keys.F).IsDown().With(Keys.Control).Do((sender, e) => ShowFindWindow());

Does that exist?

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Cool idea! I haven't seen anything like this, perhaps Jeremy Miller has done some work on StoryTeller (storyteller.tigris.org/source/browse/storyteller/trunk)? –  Brett Veenstra Nov 2 '09 at 15:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I decided that this was a challenge and that this could let me learn what Fluent is, so I coded a Fluent keyboard class. I don't think I follow all fluent language structure and rules, but it work.

Helper extension method

/// <summary>
/// Provides a set of static (Shared in Visual Basic) methods for starting a fluent expression on a <see cref="System.Windows.Form.Control"/> object.
/// </summary>
public static class ControlExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Starts a fluent expression that occurs when a key is pressed.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="control">The control on which the fluent keyboard expression is occuring.</param>
    /// <param name="keys">The key when it will happen.</param>
    /// <returns>A <see cref="KeyboardFluent"/> object that makes it possible to write a fluent expression.</returns>
    public static KeyboardFluent When(this Control control, Keys keys)
    {
        return new KeyboardFluent(control).When(keys);
    }
}

The fluent class

/// <summary>
/// Represents a fluent expression for handling keyboard event.
/// </summary>
public class KeyboardFluent
{
    /// <summary>
    /// The control on which the fluent keyboard expression is occuring.
    /// </summary>
    private Control control;

    /// <summary>
    /// The KeyDown and KeyUp handler.
    /// </summary>
    private KeyEventHandler keyHandler;

    /// <summary>
    /// Stores if the IsDown method was called and that the KeyDown event is registered.
    /// </summary>
    private bool isDownRegistered = false;

    /// <summary>
    /// Stores if the IsUp method was called and that the KeyUp event is registered.
    /// </summary>
    private bool isUpRegistered = false;

    /// <summary>
    /// The list of keys that will make the actions be executed when they are down or up.
    /// </summary>
    private List<Keys> triggerKeys;

    /// <summary>
    /// The modifiers keys that must be down at the same time than the trigger keys for the actions to be executed.
    /// </summary>
    private Keys modifiers;

    /// <summary>
    /// The list of actions that will be executed when the trigger keys and modifiers are down or up.
    /// </summary>
    private List<Action<object, KeyEventArgs>> actions;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="KeyboardFluent"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="control">The control on which the fluent keyboard expression is occuring.</param>
    public KeyboardFluent(Control control)
    {
        this.control = control;
        this.triggerKeys = new List<Keys>();
        this.actions = new List<Action<object, KeyEventArgs>>();
        this.keyHandler = new KeyEventHandler(OnKeyHandler);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Handles the KeyDown or KeyUp event on the control.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sender">The control on which the event is occuring.</param>
    /// <param name="e">A <see cref="KeyEventArgs"/> that gives information about the keyboard event.</param>
    private void OnKeyHandler(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
    {
        if (this.triggerKeys.Contains(e.KeyCode) && e.Modifiers == this.modifiers)
        {
            this.actions.ForEach(action => action(sender, e));
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Makes the keyboard event occured when a key is pressed down.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Returns itself to allow a fluent expression structure.</returns>
    public KeyboardFluent IsDown()
    {
        if (!isDownRegistered)
        {
            this.control.KeyDown += this.keyHandler;
            isDownRegistered = true;
        }
        return this;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Makes the keyboard event occured when a key is pressed up.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Returns itself to allow a fluent expression structure.</returns>
    public KeyboardFluent IsUp()
    {
        if (!isUpRegistered)
        {
            this.control.KeyUp += this.keyHandler;
            isUpRegistered = true;
        }
        return this;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a new trigger on a key.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key">The key on which the actions will occur.</param>
    /// <returns>Returns itself to allow a fluent expression structure.</returns>
    public KeyboardFluent When(Keys key)
    {
        this.triggerKeys.Add(key);
        return this;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Adds a modifier filter that is checked before the action are executed.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="modifiers">The modifier key.</param>
    /// <returns>Returns itself to allow a fluent expression structure.</returns>
    public KeyboardFluent With(Keys modifiers)
    {
        this.modifiers |= modifiers;
        return this;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Executes the action when the specified keys and modified are either pressed down or up.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="action">The action to be executed.</param>
    /// <returns>Returns itself to allow a fluent expression structure.</returns>
    public KeyboardFluent Do(Action<object, KeyEventArgs> action)
    {
        this.actions.Add(action);
        return this;
    }
}

I can now type

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        this.When(Keys.F).With(Keys.Control).IsDown().Do((sender, e) => MessageBox.Show(e.KeyData.ToString()));
    }
}

and it will display the messagebox only when Ctrl+F is down.

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I downloaded the Reactive Extension Framework for the .Net Framework 3.5 SP1.

I was able to do the same:

Observable.FromEvent<KeyEventArgs>(this, "KeyDown")
    .Where(e => e.EventArgs.KeyCode == Keys.F && e.EventArgs.Modifiers == Keys.Control)
    .Subscribe(e => MessageBox.Show(e.EventArgs.KeyData.ToString()));

This is some pretty powerful stuff.

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.NET 4 will introduce the reactive framework (IObservable<T>, IObserver<T> and helper extension types) which should offer exactly this.

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The reactive framework doesn't provide a fluent interface for this. It provides LINQ to events, which is fairly different. –  Reed Copsey Oct 30 '09 at 16:26
    
Today, I stumbled on an article on the Rx Framework and it is available on .NET Framework 3.5 sp1. I tried to do the same thing and it worked perfectly with a lot more of options. –  Pierre-Alain Vigeant Dec 4 '09 at 20:02

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