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I want a messagebox to pop up when checkbox R1P1 is NOT checked using try and catch. But I have no clue what to put inside the () in catch?

    private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            if (R1P1.Checked) 
            {
                string Plats1 = "R1P1"; 
                TxtP.Text = Plats1;  
            }
            else 
            {
                TxtP.Text = null; 
            }
         }
        catch (???) 
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Hey");
        }

I've tried catch (R1P1.Checked == false;) but it dosen't work. In the program you have a bunch of checkboxes for a ticket system and when you don't check anyone of them but click continue anyways, I want the checkbox to appear.

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2  
You don't catch conditions - you catch exceptions. There's no indication of an exception or any need for an exception here. –  Jon Skeet May 12 '13 at 11:42
    
Try/Catch blocks are not commonly used for flow control. There are some situations where they can be used like that but yours isn't one of them. –  Dirk May 12 '13 at 11:42
1  
It's seems like you can't use try and catch for this specific scenario. Thanks for the answers and comments! –  user2367396 May 12 '13 at 11:50
    
@user2367396 good learning! ;) keep your stackoverflow account healthy and mark a valid answer correct or ask someone who commented to post their comment as an answer so you can accept it. –  gordatron May 12 '13 at 12:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Whats the try catch for? would this not work:

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{

        if (R1P1.Checked) 
        {
            string Plats1 = "R1P1"; 
            TxtP.Text = Plats1;  
        }
        else 
        {
            TxtP.Text = null; 
             MessageBox.Show("Hey");
        }
 }

Good Point Jon! AFAIK { and } define a code block which has its own scope: so generally anything declared between them will no longer exist when you hit the close bracket. this mans that string Plats1 is never used and cannot be seen elsewhere.

making this the same:

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
        if (R1P1.Checked) 
        {
            TxtP.Text = "R1P1";  
            //anything declared here (i.e. a new variable)
        }//is gone by here
        else 
        {
            TxtP.Text = null;
            MessageBox.Show("Hey");
        }
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
Ideally without the pointless local variable Plats1 :) –  Jon Skeet May 12 '13 at 11:42
    
The point of using try and catch is for higher grades... –  user2367396 May 12 '13 at 11:43
1  
@user2367396: Then you should find a different example, where exceptions are appropriate. –  Jon Skeet May 12 '13 at 11:43
    
@user2367396 i was always told exceptions are for exceptional circumstances (e.g. database not responding or file is corrupt) in this case an if statement is good as you know that there user may or may not have checked the box. maybe load default values form a text file and throw an exception if it does not match expected format or is missing? –  gordatron May 12 '13 at 11:54

In this case, there is no point in a try{}catch{} block at all.

Why catch an exception at all?

You already know when it isn't checked - just call the message box on your else clause:

if (R1P1.Checked) 
{
    TxtP.Text = "R1P1";  
}
else 
{
    TxtP.Text = ""; 
    MessageBox.Show("Hey");
}
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