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I'm a beginner in OSL and got quiet confused about its "radiance closure".

Just diffuse closure as an example. We can directly write

Ci = diffuse(N)

in an osl file to use diffuse closure. And the document says "the internals of the closure are left to the implementation in the render". But I know diffuse is a built-in closure in OSL and OSL has already implemented eval_reflect(), eval_transmit,sample() interfaces for diffuse in bsdf_diffsue.cpp. For example, eval_reflect() is as follow:

Color3 eval_reflect (const Vec3 &omega_out, const Vec3 &omega_in, float& pdf) const
{
    float cos_pi = std::max(m_N.dot(omega_in),0.0f) * (float) M_1_PI;
    pdf = cos_pi;
    return Color3 (cos_pi, cos_pi, cos_pi);
}

So it seems there is nothing else to be done in the outside render. So what "the internals of the closure are left to the implementation in the render" means exactly?

Any explanation will be appreciated! Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The question has been open for some time, but I'll give it a shot anyway.

In bsdf_diffuse.cpp, or even, for every file bsdf_*.cpp under the oslexec folder, you'll find classes that inherit from BSDFClosure, meaning each one of these are themselves closures.

The methods

Color3 eval_reflect (const Vec3 &omega_out, const Vec3 &omega_in, float& pdf) const;
Color3 eval_transmit (const Vec3 &omega_out, const Vec3 &omega_in, float& pdf) const;
ustring sample (const Vec3 &Ng,
                 const Vec3 &omega_out, const Vec3 &domega_out_dx, const Vec3 &domega_out_dy,
                 float randu, float randv,
                 Vec3 &omega_in, Vec3 &domega_in_dx, Vec3 &domega_in_dy,
                 float &pdf, Color3 &eval) const;

are called at a later time, multiple times, if needed, by the host renderer. Hence, the need for the renderer own internals: it's up for the renderer to decide when to actually call these.

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