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in c++ I'm trying to create a triangle class using a point class. the correct way in java would be:

    public class Point {
    double x, y;

    public Point(double x, double y){
        this.x=x;
        this.y=y;
    }    
    }

public class Triangle {
Point p1,p2,p3;

public Triangle(Point p1, Point p2, Point p3){
    this.p1=p1;
    this.p2=p2;
    this.p3=p3;
}
}

in main:

Point p1=new Point(0,0);
Point p2=new Point(1,1);
Point p3=new Point(-1,1);
Triangle t1=new Trianle(p1,p2,p3);

in c++ I have:

class point{
double x1,y1;

public:

       point(double x, double y){
       x1=x;
       y1=y;
       }  

};         

class triangle{
point p1, p2, p3;

public:

       triangle(point varp1, point varp2, point varp3){
       p1=varp1;
       p2=varp2;
       p3=varp3;
       }
};

in main:

    point p1(-1,1);
    point p2(1,1);
    point p3(0,0);
    triangle t1(p1,p2,p3);

somehow this doesnt work, why? ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

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closed as not a real question by Jean-Bernard Pellerin, null, Niels Keurentjes, Maroun Maroun, rene May 12 '13 at 19:52

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
In what way doesn't it work? In the way that your class names are in a different language to their constructors? –  Joseph Mansfield May 12 '13 at 14:48
1  
Please post your real C++ code and explain exactly what your error is rather than type random stuff at the end of your post to evade the filter. –  Mat May 12 '13 at 14:51
    
The constructors should have the same name as the class. And you should use constructor initialization lists. –  juanchopanza May 12 '13 at 14:52
    
The compiler can't translate German dreieck to triangle. –  hr_117 May 12 '13 at 14:53
4  
That is because you are not using constructor initialization lists, so your triangle's points get default constructed. And your point class has no default constructor. –  juanchopanza May 12 '13 at 14:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It won't work because the triangle constructor will attempt to default construct its point members before assigning to them, but point doesn't have a default constructor. This is because you provide only a point constructor that takes 2 arguments, so the defaulted default constructor is deleted.

Instead, you should use a member initialization list to initialise the points:

dreieck(point varp1, point varp2, point varp3)
  : p1(varp1), p2(varp2), p3(varp3)
{ }

This initialises each of the members p1, p2, and p3 with the arguments varp1, varp2, and varp3 respectively, therefore avoiding the default construction.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for not b*tching at the typos and actually helping. worked! –  IAM May 12 '13 at 14:57
2  
@user2302476 I think I was the one who was bitching about the typos. Also, it's not bitching, it's trying to understand your problem. –  Joseph Mansfield May 12 '13 at 14:58
1  
@user2302476, being accurate is not "bitching about typos", the compiler is stricter than stackoverflow commenters. If you're a programmer then you need to be accurate. Posting innaccurate or incomplete code is a waste of everyone's time. –  Jonathan Wakely May 12 '13 at 15:04
    
I was talking about Mat, who even could't read my notes about where is java code, and where ist c++. bitching is agressive "pointing", if you do it not agressiveley, I hav nothing against it –  IAM May 12 '13 at 15:14

In C++ member variables are constructed before the body of the constructor and if you don't specify how they should be constructed then they will be default-initialized, so your constructor is equivalent to this

 triangle(point varp1, point varp2, point varp3)
 : p1(), p2(), p3()  // <--- default-initialize each member
 {
   p1=varp1;
   p2=varp2;
   p3=varp3;
 }

Now it should be obvious that your constructor doesn't create the members as copies of the constructor arguments, it creates them as default-constructed objects then assigns new values to them, and to do that the point class needs a default constructor.

The other answers show how to do it correctly: use the member initializer list. You should do this for the point constructor too. Using member initializers is the idiomatic way to construct member variables and base classes in C++, rather than assignment in the constructor body. For some types of members variables (reference, const objects, and non-DefaultConstructible types) it's the only way to initialize member variables.

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Your point class is not defined (or automatically provided with) a default-constructor. Because you overloaded the constructor, the compiler-generated one was not included. And in your triangle class you're default-constructing three objects of type point. You'll get an error because there is no default-constructor available.

You should explicitly define your constructor (and you should initialize your members through the member-initializer list), for example:

class point
{
    public:
        point() : x1(0), y1(0) {}
        ...
};

Moreover, if we make your parameritized constructor take optional arguments, it can act as a default-constructor. For example:

class point
{
    public:
        point(double x = 0, double y = 0) : x1(x), y1(y) {}
        ...
};
share|improve this answer
1  
While your answer is technically correct, the OP's triangle constructor would be improved by using member initializers instead of assignment, and then there's no real need for a default constructor (although adding one may be useful anyway) –  Jonathan Wakely May 12 '13 at 15:08

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