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Below is a class using the singleton design pattern:

class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton instance;
    private Singleton()
    {
        ...
    }

    public static synchronized Singleton getInstance()
    {
        if (instance == null)
            instance = new Singleton();

        return instance;
    }
    ...
    public void doSomething()
    {
        ... 
    }
}

I wanted to know some design issues about the above class? Why is the instance variable instance private and static. I understand that being private make the instance variable accessible only to object of that specific class but how does it help?

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marked as duplicate by NINCOMPOOP, ollo, ldav1s, john.k.doe, flavian May 13 '13 at 0:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Added Java since I'm not aware of the synchronized keyword in c#. –  Andy May 12 '13 at 15:31
    
Do you really need to instantiate it lazy? –  NilsH May 12 '13 at 15:33
    
@NoobUnChained i disagree this is a dup. He's asking if there is anything wrong with this particular implementation, not what abuses of singleton could come about. –  Andy May 12 '13 at 15:36

1 Answer 1

If it was public, everybody could use Singleton.instance and would complain because it's null. Making it private forces them to use getInstance(), which guarantees to return a non-null instance.

If it wasn't static, it would be an instance variable of Singleton, and you would thus need a Singleton instance to access the unique Singleton instance which doesn't make much sense.

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Deleted........ –  Andy May 12 '13 at 15:32

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