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I'm programming A* code and have a weird 'Segmentation Fault' problem trying to access to a int** matrix.

Here the code of an example of matrix. When i try t plot the first cout i obtained a segmentation fault 11.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int** matriz;

    matriz = (int**) malloc(10 * sizeof(int));

    // Defino una matriz de 10x12
    for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
    {
        matriz[i] = (int*) malloc(12 * sizeof(int));

        for (int j=0; j < 12; j++)
        {
            if( i == 11 && j == 5)
                matriz[i][j] = 13;
            else if( i == 10 && j == 7)
                matriz[i][j] = 5;
            else if( i == 3 && j == 11)
                matriz[i][j] = 4;
            else
                matriz[i][j] = 0;
        }
    }

    // Imprimo valores de prueba para comprobar que todos son accesible y que no encuentro un 'Segmentation Fault'
    cout << "Valor en (11, 5) --> " << matriz[11][5] << endl;
    cout << "Valor en (10, 7) --> " << matriz[10][7] << endl;
    cout << "Valor normal 0 en (4, 4) --> " << matriz[4][4] << endl;
    cout << "Valor en (3, 11) --> " << matriz[3][11] << endl;

    return 0;
}

Someone could tell what i'm doing wrong. I can't understand why i can plot the value of coordinates for example (4,4) and (3,11) but no those (11, 5) or (10,7) which are nears the boders of the matrix.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
This is C++ code. You posted in a wrong section. –  ashish2expert May 12 '13 at 17:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you use C++ (or better yet C++11, e.g. with a recent GCC -4.7 or better- compiler with g++ -std=gnu++11 -Wall ), you could use std::array (or std::vector at least).

And you should at least code

  matriz = (int**) malloc(10 * sizeof(int*));
  if (!matriz) { perror("malloc matriz"); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); };

(on my Linux/Debian/x86-64 machine, sizeof(int) is 4, but sizeof(int*) is 8)

because each individual element of matriz, e.g. matriz[3] is a pointer.

I would rather suggest using std::array in C++11, and coding

  auto matriz = new std::array<std::array<int,12>,10>();

and #include <array>

share|improve this answer
    
I usually use the c++ standar structures vector or deque but now i use malloc and pointers to remember the concepts. –  Jorge Vega Sánchez May 12 '13 at 17:31
    
I apply the modification you suggest me but the problem persist. I use OS X and g++ to compile the code. –  Jorge Vega Sánchez May 12 '13 at 17:34
    
Then, learn to use the debugger (perhaps gdb) after compiling with g++ -Wall -g –  Basile Starynkevitch May 12 '13 at 17:38
    
Also, test that malloc succeeded; I just edited my answer to add such a test. –  Basile Starynkevitch May 12 '13 at 18:10

First of all you can read Why pointer to pointer and vector of vector is bad for simple matrices. You'll need to enter password "p2pbad" (without "").

This line

cout << "Valor en (11, 5) --> " << matriz[11][5] << endl;

will try to access an element which is not present since your matrix has only 10 rows but you want to get data from row 11 -> segmentation fault. For the same reason the condition

if( i == 11 && j == 5)

does not make sense. i will never be 11, nor will i == 10 in the next condition ever be true since i<10.

Writing really nice code for universal matrix handling is a huge task but you could probably write a simple/basic, templated matrix class with some effort.

A basic example using std::allocator would be like

template <typename _T>
class basic_matrix
{
public:
  typedef basic_matrix<_T>                this_type;
  typedef ::std::allocator<_T>            alloc;
  typedef typename alloc::value_type      value;
  typedef typename alloc::pointer         ptr;
  typedef typename alloc::const_pointer   const_ptr;
  typedef typename alloc::reference       ref;
  typedef typename alloc::const_reference const_ref;
  typedef typename alloc::size_type       size;
  typedef typename alloc::difference_type diff;
  typedef _T&&                            r_ref;

  basic_matrix (void) 
    : _data(nullptr), _x(0U), _y(0U)
  {
  }

  basic_matrix (size const & x, size const & y) 
    : _data(nullptr), _x(0U), _y(0U)
  {
    resize(x,y);
  }

  ~basic_matrix (void)
  {
    if (!empty()) clear();
  }

  void resize (size const &x, size const &y)
  {
    if (x == 0 && y == 0)
    {
      clear();
    }
    else
    {
      ptr new_location = _Allocate(x*y);
      if (!empty())
      { // old data existent -> copy it
        try 
        {
          size const N = min(x, _x), M = min(y, _y);
          for (size i=0; i<N; ++i)
          {
            for (size j=0; j<M; ++j)
            {
              *(new_location + i*y + j) = *(_data + i*_y + j);
            }
          }
        }
        catch (...)
        {
          _Deallocate(new_location, x*y);
          clear();
          throw;
        }
      }
      _data = new_location;
      _x = x;
      _y = y;
    }
  }

  ref operator() (size const &x, size const &y)
  {
    if (x >= _x || y >= _y) throw std::exception("OUT OF RANGE");
    return *(_data + x*_y + y);
  }

  const_ref operator() (size const &x, size const &y) const
  {
    if (x >= _x || y >= _y) throw std::exception("OUT OF RANGE");
    return *(_data + x*_y + y);
  }

  bool empty (void) const
  {
    return (_data == nullptr);
  }

  void clear (void)
  {
    _Deallocate(_data, _x*_y);
    _data = nullptr;
    _x = 0U;
    _y = 0U;
  }

protected:

  ptr _data;
  size _x, _y;
  alloc _allocator;

  ptr _Allocate (size const &num)
  {
    ptr new_location;
    try 
    {
      new_location = _allocator.allocate(num);
    }
    catch (...)
    {
      clear();
      throw;
    }
    return new_location;
  }

  void _Deallocate (ptr location, size const &num)
  {
    _allocator.deallocate(location, num);
  }

};

You will be required to add a copy constructor and an assignment operator and some other stuff ... whatever you want your matrix interface to behave like...

This works using code like this:

int main (void)
{

  basic_matrix<int> matriz(10, 12);

    // Defino una matriz de 10x12
    for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
    {
        for (int j=0; j < 12; j++)
        {
            if( i == 9 && j == 7)
                matriz(i,j) = 5;
            else if( i == 3 && j == 11)
                matriz(i,j) = 4;
            else
                matriz(i,j) = 0;
        }
    }
    cout << "Valor en (10, 7) --> " << matriz(9,7) << endl;
    cout << "Valor normal 0 en (4, 4) --> " << matriz(4,4) << endl;
    cout << "Valor en (3, 11) --> " << matriz(3,11) << endl;
    return 0;
}

It prints:

Valor en (10, 7) --> 5
Valor normal 0 en (4, 4) --> 0
Valor en (3, 11) --> 4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your explanation. It helps me a lot. –  Jorge Vega Sánchez May 12 '13 at 21:18

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