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My document structure looks like this

{
    "_id" : "311acd33a0ae8dcc3101246f90af9dc5",
    "created_datetime" : ISODate("2013-04-05T10:35:31.143Z"),
    "installs" : [
        {
            "status" : 1,
            "app" : "xyz",
            "reg_id" : "AVJyaIFI2Q8v93YmOHI5kEOVoCLbd4CAUyVK9zLrC1QCiBcl_bw89i5PvhEuTKmxtb4x130vjMyo78zPI7cedErcRv_Jjn0BN3Wq40hhg",
            "last_action_datetime" : ISODate("2013-04-05T10:35:31.143Z"),
            "version" : "2"
        },
        {
            "status" : 1,
            "app" : "abc",                                                
            "reg_id" : "AVJyaIFI2Q8v93YmOHI5kEOVoCLbd4CAUyVK9zLrC1QCiBcl_bw89i5PvhEuTKmxtb4x130vjMyo78zPI7cedErcRv_Jjn0BN3Wq40hhg",
            "last_action_datetime" : ISODate("2013-04-05T10:35:31.143Z"),
            "version" : "5"
        },
        {
            "status" : 1,
            "app" : "pqr",                                                
            "last_action_datetime" : ISODate("2013-04-06T10:35:31.143Z"),
            "version" : "1"
        },
    ],
    "last_update" : ISODate("2013-04-12T06:26:46.333Z"),
    "num_updates" : 9,
    .....
}

and i have a compound index on 'install.reg_id' and 'installs.status' and a single index on 'installs.status'

Now i want to find all documents where at least on element of installs contains reg_id and also its status is 1. So i query

db.users.find({'installs': {'$elemMatch': {'reg_id': {'$exists':  true}, 'status': 1}}}).explain()

i get

{
        "cursor" : "BtreeCursor installs.status_1",
        "isMultiKey" : true,
        "n" : 1447034,
        "nscannedObjects" : 1720864,
        "nscanned" : 1720864,
        "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 1720864,
        "nscannedAllPlans" : 1720864,
        "scanAndOrder" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "nYields" : 13072,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "millis" : 11063,
        "indexBounds" : {
                "installs.status" : [
                        [
                                1,
                                1
                        ]
                ]
        },
        "server" : "####:27017"
}

So here the compound index should have been used but is not being used. I thought that $elemMatch is the culprit so i did this query

db.users.find({'installs.reg_id': {'$exists':  true}}).explain()

and i get

{
        "cursor" : "BasicCursor",
        "isMultiKey" : false,
        "n" : 2947446,
        "nscannedObjects" : 3184871,
        "nscanned" : 3184871,
        "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 3184871,
        "nscannedAllPlans" : 3184871,
        "scanAndOrder" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "nYields" : 23865,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "millis" : 16172,
        "indexBounds" : {

        },
        "server" : "####:27017"
}

This shows that the query is not using any indexes.

Any idea what goes wrong here?

Update: Adding the hint does make the query use indexes

db.users.find({'installs': {'$elemMatch': {'reg_id': {'$exists':  true}, 'status': 1}}}).hint({"installs.reg_id":1,"installs.status":1}).explain()

returns

{
        "cursor" : "BtreeCursor installs.reg_id_1_installs.status_1",
        "isMultiKey" : true,
        "n" : 1451589,
        "nscannedObjects" : 2464985,
        "nscanned" : 4373261,
        "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 2464985,
        "nscannedAllPlans" : 4373261,
        "scanAndOrder" : false,
        "indexOnly" : false,
        "nYields" : 20170,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "millis" : 106353,
        "indexBounds" : {
                "installs.reg_id" : [
                        [
                                {
                                        "$minElement" : 1
                                },
                                {
                                        "$maxElement" : 1
                                }
                        ]
                ],
                "installs.status" : [
                        [
                                1,
                                1
                        ]
                ]
        },
        "server" : "####:27017"
}

Here the compound index is used.

share|improve this question
    
can you include one more explain - with hint? So repeat your elemMatch query but after the query before explain() add .hint({"installs.reg_id":1,"installs.status":1}) –  Asya Kamsky May 12 '13 at 20:24
    
@AsyaKamsky I updated my question. thanks but still there is a big difference between n and nscanned. Why is that if the index is used? –  lovesh May 12 '13 at 20:39
    
it's because of selectivity of the index (or lack thereof). I'm composing a full answer. –  Asya Kamsky May 12 '13 at 20:48
    
@AsyaKamsky Also i dont understand why indexOnly is false when my compound index covers all the fields in my query? –  lovesh May 12 '13 at 20:52
    
that's because you are asking for the entire document and not just the indexed fields. But regardless this is a multikey index (array) so it's not going to be able to be used as a covered index. –  Asya Kamsky May 12 '13 at 20:55

2 Answers 2

There is nothing going wrong. The query optimizer is choosing the index which is giving better performance/selectivity.

You can confirm this by "hinting" that the query use the index you want it to use and comparing how many elements and documents it needs to scan to find those it needs to return.

Looking at your explain, I can see that reg_id exists on over 92.5% of index entries in the index you want your query to use. This is not very selective. Using the index you want it to use only narrows 3.1M documents/entries to 2.9M - not very good.

Using the status_1 index it immediately narrows the "candidates" down to 1.7M and now going through all of them it finds 1.4M have reg_id.

Having more selective indexes is key, but don't forget that in this case you are asking it to return 1.4M documents so it's hard to be very selective when this many documents need to be scanned.

Another thing is equality and such are much more effective operations for indexes (even in-equality) than {$exists}. Even {$ne:null} is going to be better than $exists - in general it's not a good idea to rely on queries that use $exists or even inequalities to be performant like equality or smaller range queries can be (when using indexes).

More information can be found here: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/applications/indexes/ and in particular here: http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/tutorial/create-queries-that-ensure-selectivity/

share|improve this answer
    
So does creating an index {"installs.status":1,"installs.reg_id":1} makes my query performance better? –  lovesh May 12 '13 at 21:16
    
not by very much. you are still looking at a huge result set - even if you get nscanned=n (number returned) it won't be super-fast... maybe a different schema would be more performant but without knowing other queries and all the write patterns it's hard to say. It's possible that slow query is a result of many writes or slow disk or not enough RAM ... ? not enough information here. –  Asya Kamsky May 12 '13 at 21:36

I have the same issue. It appears to be a documented bug that is targeted for the 2.7 (Due:01/Aug/14) release:

https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/SERVER-2348

share|improve this answer

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