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I tried to convert this Java code:

// http://www.stanford.edu/class/ee368/Android/index.html  
// Source: http://www.stanford.edu/class/ee368/Android/HelloViewfinder/Project.zip
private void decodeYUV420RGB(int[] rgb, byte[] yuv420sp, int width, int height) {
     Convert YUV to RGB
    final int frameSize = width * height;
    for (int j = 0, yp = 0; j < height; j++) {
        int uvp = frameSize + (j >> 1) * width, u = 0, v = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < width; i++, yp++) {
            int y = (0xff & ((int) yuv420sp[yp])) - 16;
            if (y < 0) y = 0;
            if ((i & 1) == 0) {
                v = (0xff & yuv420sp[uvp++]) - 128;
                u = (0xff & yuv420sp[uvp++]) - 128;
            }

            int y1192 = 1192 * y;
            int r = (y1192 + 1634 * v);
            int g = (y1192 - 833 * v - 400 * u);
            int b = (y1192 + 2066 * u);

            if (r < 0) r = 0; else if (r > 262143) r = 262143;
            if (g < 0) g = 0; else if (g > 262143) g = 262143;
            if (b < 0) b = 0; else if (b > 262143) b = 262143;

            rgb[yp] = 0xff000000 | ((r << 6) & 0xff0000) | ((g >> 2) & 0xff00) | ((b >> 10) & 0xff);
        }
    }
}

which is called this way:

//byte[] mYUVData; int[] mRGBData;
decodeYUV420RGB(mRGBData, mYUVData, mImageWidth, mImageHeight);

to this C code:

#include <string.h>
#include <jni.h>

jint*
Java_com_camera_DrawOnTop_decodeYUV420RGB565(JNIEnv* env, jobject  thiz, jintArray rgb, jbyteArray yuv420sp, jint width, jint height)
{
 jbyte* yuv420spc = (*env)->GetByteArrayElements(env, yuv420sp, NULL);
 jint*  rgbc      = (*env)->GetIntArrayElements(env, rgb, NULL);

    int frameSize = width * height;
    int j;
    int i;
    int yp;
    for (j = 0, yp = 0; j < height; j++) {
        int uvp = frameSize + (j >> 1) * width, u = 0, v = 0;
        for (i = 0; i < width; i++, yp++) {
            int y = (0xff & ((int) yuv420spc[yp])) - 16;
            if (y < 0) y = 0;
            if ((i & 1) == 0) {
                v = (0xff & yuv420spc[uvp++]) - 128;
                u = (0xff & yuv420spc[uvp++]) - 128;
            }

            int y1192 = 1192 * y;
            int r = (y1192 + 1634 * v);
            int g = (y1192 - 833 * v - 400 * u);
            int b = (y1192 + 2066 * u);

            if (r < 0) r = 0; else if (r > 262143) r = 262143;
            if (g < 0) g = 0; else if (g > 262143) g = 262143;
            if (b < 0) b = 0; else if (b > 262143) b = 262143;

            rgbc[yp] = 0xff000000 | ((r << 6) & 0xff0000) | ((g >> 2) & 0xff00) | ((b >> 10) & 0xff);
        }
    }

(*env)->ReleaseByteArrayElements(env, yuv420sp, yuv420spc, 0 );
(*env)->ReleaseIntArrayElements(env, rgb, rgbc, 0 );
return rgbc;

}

and call it via JNI:

//int[] mRGBData; int [] tmpData = {1,2,3};
mRGBData = decodeYUV420RGB565(tmpData, mYUVData, mImageWidth, mImageHeight);

But the program breaks running after the above call. I don't now how to do call by reference with JNI so I used tmpData only to have data but return real data to mRGBData via equals sign.

What's wrong with my C code so it breaks at running time?

And what have I to change so that it works with reference like the original code (without equals sign)?

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3 Answers 3

You should provide to your JNI function an RGB array of correct size (that is, w*h), and an YUV array of correct size and structure (w*h*3/2, with w*h luma bytes (Y), followed by (w/2)*(h/2) pairs of chroma (U and V) bytes. The call will crash if you provide rgb array of size 3, as in your snippet.

Also note that you are building an rgb565 array. Its elements are probably expected to be of type short (16 bit) and not int (32 bit).

share|improve this answer
    
The original code for Android gets a camera preview in onPreviewFrame(byte[] data, Camera camera) and sets mYUVData = new byte[data.length] and mRGBData = new int[previewWidth * previewHeight] and works. So I want at present only change the Java to C method because I don't want to "change a running system" (only make it faster). –  KWT May 13 '13 at 14:52
    
@KWT: I am really not sure your direct translation of Java code to C will make the code faster. Dlavik has enough JIT optimizations to make the Java code perform efficiently, and JNI introduces some overhead. So, I recommend that you measure the performance of two approaches, and make a wise choice. –  Alex Cohn May 14 '13 at 7:04
    
@KWT: you may look for very efficient assembler implementations of yuv2rgb, especially if your target devices support NEON instructions: wss.co.uk/pinknoise/yuv2rgb. –  Alex Cohn May 14 '13 at 7:13

GetByteArrayElements() creates an array on the C side, which you fill, then release, then return to Java, which gets a pointer to released memory. If you want to actually get the data over to the Java side, you need to create a new Java array object and return that. Or, create the new object on the Java side and pass it to the C code to modify. I find the latter is usually easier. I usually create a DirectByteBuffer on the Java side and pass it into the native function, let the native function call GetDirectBufferAddress and write into that.

For an example, see my PD ojrandlib JNI code: https://github.com/lcrocker/ojrandlib/tree/master/source/java/com/onejoker/randlib

share|improve this answer
    
You're wrong. GetByteArrayElements() pins an existing Java array to an array on the C side just fine. There are other problems with the code. –  Alex Cohn May 13 '13 at 10:01
    
@Alex Cohn/Lee Daniel Crocker: It seems it depends on the JVM if GetByteArrayElements() does a call by reference or call by value and you can't foresee it: publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/javasdk/v1r4m2/… –  KWT May 13 '13 at 14:28
    
@KWT: No, you cannot forsee if GetByteArrayElements() will use the array in-place or it will produce a copy. But in both cases, using ReleaseByteArrayElements(...., 0) will make sure that the Java array gets all changes you made to the bytes you got from GetByteArrayElements(). If the overhead of two memcpy operationsis acceptable, depends on the scenario. –  Alex Cohn May 14 '13 at 6:57
    
@KWT: ... but the implementation detail of the Android Virtual Machine is that it always gives you int array in-place. –  Alex Cohn May 14 '13 at 7:00

I changed code to this:

Java:

native void decodeYUV420RGB565(ByteBuffer rgb, byte[] yuv420sp, int width, int height); 
//There's no allocateDirect for IntBuffer so I have to use ByteBuffer
//although mRGBData is an int array
//allocateDirect(mRGBData.length * 4) because mRGBData is an int array
ByteBuffer mTempData = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(mRGBData.length*4);
decodeYUV420RGB565(mTempData, mYUVData, mImageWidth, mImageHeight);
mRGBData = mTempData.asIntBuffer().array();
mTempData.clear();

C:

void Java_com_camera_DrawOnTop_decodeYUV420RGB565(JNIEnv* env, jobject thiz, jintArray rgb, jbyteArray yuv420sp, jint width, jint height)
{
 jbyte* yuv420spc = (*env)->GetByteArrayElements(env, yuv420sp, NULL);
 jint*  rgbc      = (*env)->GetDirectBufferAddress(env, thiz);

 //...conversion code as above...

 (*env)->ReleaseByteArrayElements(env, yuv420sp, yuv420spc, 0 );
 (*env)->ReleaseIntArrayElements(env, rgb, rgbc, 0 );

But I have the same problem: Code crashes when I call decodeYUV420RGB565(mTempData, mYUVData, mImageWidth, mImageHeight). What have I to change in the code?

share|improve this answer
    
meta It is OK to post an answer to your own question on stackoverflow, but this is not an answer: it still crashes. It's more appropriate, IMHO, as an update to your original question. –  Alex Cohn May 14 '13 at 7:15
    
You switched to direct byte buffer. But your native function still calls ReleaseIntArrayElements(). This cannot work. –  Alex Cohn May 14 '13 at 7:16
    
In your Java code, you all array() method for the direct byte buffer. This call crashes. ByteBuffer class has a hasArray() method to indicate if array() method may be used. An implementation detail of Android VM is that buffers that answer positive to isDirect() answer negative to hasArray(), and vice versa. –  Alex Cohn May 14 '13 at 7:21
    
Generally speaking, use of direct byte buffers to "share" memory between Java and native may give performance improvements. But not in your case. You need the result in a form of int array, which requires copying all the elements of the direct byte buffer. It's cheaper to use GetIntArrayElements() / ReleaseIntArrayElements(). It may be even cheaper to use GetPrimitiveArrayCritical() / ReleasePrimitiveArrayCritical(). Note that for yuv420sp you may call ReleaseByteArrayElements(env, yuv420sp, yuv420spc, JNI_ABORT) –  Alex Cohn May 14 '13 at 7:25

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