Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Considering this piece of code:

values = ["one", "two", "", "four"]

values.each do |value|
puts value.empty? ? "emptyness" : "#{value} is #{value.length}"
end

is it possible in Ruby 1.8.7 to format the ternary operator indenting the operands? Something like:

puts value.empty?
    ? "emptyness" 
    : "#{value} is #{value.length}"

but this one obviously won't work.

share|improve this question
2  
Generally, you should use the ternary operator only for really short expressions. If you feel you need to use multiple lines, it is probably a better idea to use a full if [...] else [...] end to make it more readable and explicit. –  Holger Just May 12 '13 at 20:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use the character \ to split the command into newlines.

This will work:

values = ["one", "two", "", "four"]

values.each do |value|
   puts value.empty? \
     ? "emptyness" \
     : "#{value} is #{value.length}"
end

Also, you can't have any space after the \ character or a syntax error will be raised.

share|improve this answer

The way to do this using Ruby itself with no escapes is to have Ruby know that it is waiting for more information

puts value.empty?  ?
  "emptyness" :
  "#{value} is #{value.length}"

The reason for this is Ruby sees the parts of the ternary and knows that something more is needed to complete the statement.

Using parenthesis in the OP's code would not work, the statements would still be partial, and Ruby would not know what to do with the ? and : on the next line.

Of course, you don't really need the ternary:

values = ["one", "two", "", "four"]

values.each do |value|
  puts value.empty? && "emptyness" ||
    "#{value} is #{value.length}"
end
share|improve this answer
    
Alternatively, OP could use parenthesis. –  Holger Just May 12 '13 at 20:10
    
I've always find this way less expressive. It's not immediately visible that the following lines are part of the operator, but good to know. –  Dek Dekku May 12 '13 at 20:12
1  
You are right, at least the question mark needs to be on the same line (when not using escapes). That said, it's still a bad idea to split a ternary into multiple lines in the first place :) –  Holger Just May 12 '13 at 20:16
    
I'm kinda used to it... –  Dek Dekku May 12 '13 at 20:22

When the ternary operator needs to be split into multiple lines, it may be time to use an if instead:

puts if value.empty?
       "emptyness"
     else
       "#{value} is #{value.length}"
     end

This works because if, like any other expression in Ruby, has a result. That result is the result of either the then or the else section, whichever got executed (and if the condition is false and there is no else section, then the result of the if is nil).

share|improve this answer
1  
True, but not the question asked. –  vgoff May 12 '13 at 21:21
    
@vgoff, The OP's unfamiliarity with Ruby syntax suggests that the OP may not be aware of some of Ruby's more subtle points. Since this one--that if is an expression with a value--leads to another (and arguably superior) way of solving the problem, it's germane. –  Wayne Conrad May 13 '13 at 0:39
    
I would find it strange to ask questions about the ternary before becoming aware of an if statement. I assumed no unfamiliarity for the OP with Ruby syntax, but rather how expressions are terminated. Rather, asking about Ruby's more subtle point about line endings would suggest they are familiar with the syntax. Though I do agree the point the syntax is related. –  vgoff May 13 '13 at 0:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.