Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main ()
{
    //If a triangle has a perimeter of 9 units, how many iterations(each iteration is 4/3 as much) would it take to obtain a perimeter of 100 units? (or as close to 100 as you can get?)
    double p = 9; int it = 0;
    for(p; p < 100; p = p * 4/3){
        cout << p << endl;
        it++;
    }
    cout << p << endl;
    cout << it << endl;
    system ("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

So for a math project I was doing, I had to figure out how many iterations it would take for a perimeter of 9 to reach 100 if you increase the perimeter 4/3x as much during each iteration. When I write the code like I do above, the output is fine, however if I change

for(p; p < 100; p = p * 4/3)

to

for(p; p < 100; p *= 4/3)

I get output that doesn't make sense. Am I misunderstanding the *= operator? Do I need parentheses somewhere?

share|improve this question
up vote 28 down vote accepted

It's the order of operation. In p = p * 4/3 the compiler is doing:

p = (p * 4)/3

However in p *= 4/3, the compiler is doing:

p = p * (4/3)

4/3 is 1 on the computer because of integer division, so the second example is basically multiplying by 1.

Instead of dividing by 3 (an integer), divide by 3.0 (a double) or 3.0f (a float). Then p *= 4/3.0 and p = p * 4/3.0 are the same.

share|improve this answer
2  
When in doubt, add parenthesis! – Jonathon Reinhart May 12 '13 at 20:11
6  
Or get all fortrany and write 4./3 or double(4)/3 or any of a variety of other incantation which will force the use of floating point arithmetic. – dmckee May 12 '13 at 20:15
    
@Jonathon: Parentheses won't help here though, will they? p *= (4/3) is still wrong. – TonyK May 12 '13 at 20:57
2  
The clearest way to express the meaning is p *= 3.0 / 4.0 – Keith Thompson May 12 '13 at 21:56
2  
@KeithThompson Yes, except that should be p *= 4.0 / 3.0 – janm May 12 '13 at 23:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.