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I have a <li> that onhover, should change the css 'display' attribute of a button within that <li>. The idea is that hovering over that <li> should make a button appear.

Right now my HTML is:

<li class="select-bldg-listing">
     <button class="select-bldg-btn">Review</button>
</li>

my CSS:

.select-bldg-btn {
display: none;
 }

jQuery:

$('.select-bldg-listing').hover(function () {
    $('.select-bldg-btn').css('display', 'inline-block');
},
function(){
    $('.select-bldg-btn').css('display', 'none');
});

But nothing happens when I mouseover on the page. What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Have you done some debugging are you getting any javascript errors? Also careful with using classes as selectors as it will select all of the elements with that class. –  Nomad101 May 12 '13 at 21:15
    
Your code works jsfiddle.net/uDbNp. There must be some other errors logged in the console. –  PSL May 12 '13 at 21:17
    
Did you remember document ready ? –  adeneo May 12 '13 at 21:23
    
updated fiddle to help see what's going on. Again, it seems to be working perfectly jsfiddle.net/uDbNp/1 –  Anthony May 12 '13 at 21:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this without JavaScript:

.select-bldg-btn {
    display: none;
}

.select-bldg-listing:hover .select-bldg-btn {
    display: inline-block;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this did the trick! The jquery also worked, but this is a simpler way of achieving what I wanted to do! –  Zephyr4434 May 12 '13 at 21:32

Try this - (should change the css 'display' attribute of a button within that <li>)

$('.select-bldg-listing').hover(function () {
    $('.select-bldg-btn',this).css('display', 'inline-block');
},
function(){
    $('.select-bldg-btn',this).css('display', 'none');
});

DEMO

share|improve this answer
1  
If nothing is happening when using just the classes, how does adding context help ? –  adeneo May 12 '13 at 21:20

This could also be done with just CSS:

li.select-bldg-listing button.select-bldg-btn {
    display: none;
}

li.select-bldg-listing:hover button.select-bldg-btn {
    display: inline-block;
}

A comment about the naming of your classes; you include listing and btn in the classname. It is considered better practice to let your classes be "unaware" of the elements they apply to. In the CSS you specify with the li. or button. selector for which element of the class select-bldg you want to write a rule. This way you CSS stays cleaner and it is easier to reuse classes or rewrite them in the future.

share|improve this answer
    
As CSS is read right to left, using tagnames is actually in most cases less efficient. –  adeneo May 12 '13 at 21:28
    
I agree, from the browser's viewpoint. But the speed-loss is (I think) much less then the gain for the developer(s team) with respect to simplicity and maintenance. And we already gain speed by replacing JS (and jQuery) functions with simple CSS. –  Flaxfield May 12 '13 at 21:30

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