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I'm running the following code:

    double Scos [61][61][61] = {0};
    double kdotr;
    int ik;
    int howmany [34] = {0};
    auto Fs_ = initializer_list<int>({0});
    copy(Fs_.begin(), Fs_.end(), Fs);

    for ( size_t z=0; z<5; ++z )
    {
        for ( size_t y=0; y<5; ++y )
        {
            for ( size_t x=0; x<10; ++x )
            {
                for ( int k1=0; k1<=60; ++k1 )
                {
                    for ( int k2=0; k2<=60; ++k2 )
                    {
                        for ( int k3=0; k3<=60; ++k3 )
                        {
                            int i = x+y*10+z*50;
                            kdotr = (double)dQ*( (k1-30)*(x_[i][0]-x) + (k2-30)*(x_[i][1]-y) + (k3-30)*(x_[i][2]-z) );
                            if ( isnan(kdotr) )
                                cout << "kdotr " << k1 << " " << k2 << " " << k3 << endl;
                            Scos[k1][k2][k3] += (double)cos(kdotr);
                            if ( isnan(Scos[k1][k2][k3]) )
                                cout << "Scos "  << k1 << " " << k2 << " " << k3 << endl;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    for ( int k1=0; k1<=60; ++k1 )
    {
        for ( int k2=0; k2<=60; ++k2 )
        {
            for ( int k3=0; k3<=60; ++k3 )
            {
                double k = (double)dQ*sqrt( pow((k1-30),2) + pow((k2-30),2) + pow((k3-30),2) );
                ik = round(k/0.1);
                Fs[ik] += Scos[k1][k2][k3];
                if ( isnan(Fs[ik]) )
                    cout << "Fs[ik] " << k1 << " " << k2 << " " << k3 << endl;
                ++howmany[ik];
            }
        }
    }

At the beginning there are just some declarations and initializations (array Fs was already declared somewhere else, together with dQ and x_).

I put calls to isnan because the code strangely returns some NaNs. At first, I believed the problem was with kdotr going to infinity, which would have been argument of cos; however, the code never fails at Scos, but at some Fs[ik]. This does not make sense to me, since Fs comes from a simple sum (and it is initialized to 0).

Has ever happened to you to obtain NaN after a sum between finite terms in C++?

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4  
No, it never happened for me. On the other hand, I never had 5 for loops one within another. –  BЈовић May 12 '13 at 21:37
    
The common cause for "NaN" is that one of your other calculations use NaN as input (or do math that goes wrong and result in NaN). I suspect some of your data is incorrectly initialized. –  Mats Petersson May 12 '13 at 21:38
1  
kdotr never initialized? Why? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik May 12 '13 at 21:42
1  
The point you should take from BЈовић is not that you should not nest 5 loops, but that complex code is easy to get wrong. If you have 5 nested loops, then it is quite easy to loose track of what you are doing. There are other funny things in the code, for example, the use of Fs with the copy algorithm out of a single value... what is it that you are trying to do? Can you explain it in simple terms? Can you describe the logic in terms of smaller subproblems? Can you refactor the code into those subproblems and verify that each part works before mixing it all together? Do you need casts? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '13 at 21:47
1  
@Pippo: Make sure that all inputs of the sum are correct, infinity and NaN are not the same. Either you are accessing the wrong address in memory, or the array from which you read has not been initialized correctly. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '13 at 21:57

2 Answers 2

This sort of problem is ALWAYS caused by some input to a calculation either being "invalid" (leading to the FPU generating a NaN as the result) or using "NaN" as an input in itself.

In this case, having a quick scan through the operations you do, it seems like there are only operations that don't generate NaN based on (for example) negative inputs [like sqrt or log would do], so my thinking is that one or more of your inputs are reading uninitialized (or incorrectly initialized) data.

I would start by checking that all the components of:

 x_[i][0]-x) + (k2-30)*(x_[i][1]-y) + (k3-30)*(x_[i][2]-z

are not NaN. In particular x_[i][0,1,2].

Since your code is not a complete piece of exectutable code, and some variable's initialization isn't even in the code-snippet, it will be impossible for anyone here to give you a precise answer to where in your code it is going wrong.

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But if there would be problems with kdotr, why Scos is never seen as a NaN? –  Pippo May 12 '13 at 22:06
    
About the executable code, you are very right, but the original code is a complete molecular dynamics (it's pretty huge). –  Pippo May 12 '13 at 22:07
    
Assuming this is a x87 machine, then there's no way that Fs[ik] can be NaN without Scos being NaN, except for corruption of the actual data entries. I would add code to inspect the input value when it goes wrong. –  Mats Petersson May 12 '13 at 22:23
    
Thank you, Mats. The problem was in fact with the usage of Fs. Instead, using a temporary array Fs_ the code works. I explained it in detail in my answer. –  Pippo May 12 '13 at 22:25
    
Right, so if Fs isn't initialized correctly (e.g. contains a NaN, adding another value to that will result in a NaN). But no "legal" value added to another legal value (that is within valid range for the floating point format chosen) will result in NaN - overflows may do, but I doubt that is actually what happens. I think your Fs contains something incorrect. –  Mats Petersson May 12 '13 at 22:37

Ok, I make the code work without NaNs.

As some commenters pointed out, there could be problems with the initializations. In fact, instead of using directly Fs (which is a member of a greater class - this code itself is part of a method), I stored the sums of cosines in a temporary array Fs_, declared and initialized inside the method (e.g. like Scos): now there are no NaNs anymore.

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