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I'm trying to compare two lists to generate a buy/sell signals. The first list is a list of prices, while the second list is the simple moving average for those prices.

result = [590.0, 600.0, 590.0, 580.0, 570.0, 560.0, 570.0]
avrg = [580.0, 590.0, 593.33, 590.0, 580.0, 570.0, 566.67]
signal = ''

for prices in range(len(result)):
    for averages in range(len(avrg)):
        if result[prices] > avrg[averages]:
            signal = 'BUY'
        elif result[prices] < avrg[averages]:
            signal = 'SELL'
    lst.append(signal)

Output is

['BUY', 'BUY', 'BUY', 'BUY', 'BUY', 'SELL', 'BUY']

The output should be

['BUY', 'BUY', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'BUY']
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
result = [590.0, 600.0, 590.0, 580.0, 570.0, 560.0, 570.0]
avrg = [580.0, 590.0, 593.33, 590.0, 580.0, 570.0, 566.67]
signal = []
for i in range(len(result)):
  if (result[i] > avrg[i]):
    signal.append('BUY')
  else:
    signal.append('SELL')

gives

>>> signal
['BUY', 'BUY', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'BUY']
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You're not looping over corresponding elements of result and avrg, you're looping over each combination. For example, if you stick print(result[prices], avrg[averages]) inside the loops, you see

590.0 580.0
590.0 590.0
590.0 593.33
590.0 590.0
590.0 580.0
590.0 570.0
590.0 566.67
600.0 580.0
600.0 590.0
600.0 593.33
[.. etc.]

So the signal that gets appended is really the result of comparing result[prices] with the last element of avrg.

I think what you really want to do is compare corresponding terms, and we can use zip for that. Moreover, in Python we can loop over lists directly, and don't need to access them by index. For example:

>>> list(zip(result, avrg))
[(590.0, 580.0), (600.0, 590.0), (590.0, 593.33), (580.0, 590.0), 
(570.0, 580.0), (560.0, 570.0), (570.0, 566.67)]

And so we could write

lst = []
for price, average in zip(result, avrg):
    if price > average:
        signal = 'BUY'
    else:
        signal = 'SELL'
    lst.append(signal)

(ignoring the price == average case for simplicity)

which produces

>>> lst
['BUY', 'BUY', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'BUY']

Here, we could even use a list comprehension instead of the loop:

>>> ['BUY' if price > average else 'SELL' for price, average in zip(result, avrg)]
['BUY', 'BUY', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'SELL', 'BUY']

but the more complex the logic is, the better off you are to simply write a clear for loop.

In any case, I think the basic problem is that you're doing a full all-prices-vs-all-average comparison and taking the last value when really you want to compare corresponding elements.

[PS: I just noticed something strange. Isn't it the wrong way round to buy when the price is above average? Shouldn't you buy when it's below average, and sell when it's above?]

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