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I would like to write and then read an Object from file. Below I enclose code sample to show you my idea (it is just the sample, my Object is more complex, but the problem is the same).

My problem is:

  1. If I don't make TestObject field as static, testObject.points becomes null just on start of readObject method. I don't understand why. Could anyone give me good explanation?

  2. I would like to write one Object, and then another 2 Objects, and after this read them all (multiple object writing/reading - I want to create log file for Android).

Could you help me?

// ... IMPORT

public class TestObject implements Serializable{

    transient public ArrayList<Point[]> points;

    public TestObject()
    {
        points = new ArrayList<Point[]>();
        Point[] p1 = new Point[1];
        p1[0] = new Point(1,1);
        Point[] p2 = new Point[2];
        p2[0] = new Point(2,2);
        p2[1] = new Point(2,2);
        points.add(p1);
        points.add(p2);
    }

    private void writeObject(ObjectOutputStream stream) throws IOException 
    {
        stream.defaultWriteObject();
        stream.writeInt(points.size());
        Point[] pointsArray = null;
        for (int i = 0; i < points.size(); i++)
        {
            pointsArray = ((Point[])points.get(i));
            stream.writeInt(pointsArray.length);
            for (int j = 0; j < pointsArray.length; j++)
            {
                stream.writeInt(pointsArray[j].x);
                stream.writeInt(pointsArray[j].y);
            }
        }
    }

    private void readObject(java.io.ObjectInputStream stream) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException
    {
        stream.defaultReadObject();
        points = new ArrayList<Point[]>();
        int pointsSize = stream.readInt();
        for (int i = 0; i < pointsSize; i++)
        {
            int arraySize = stream.readInt();
            Point[] pointsArray = new Point[arraySize];
            for (int j = 0; j < arraySize; j++)
            {   
                pointsArray[j] = new Point(stream.readInt(), stream.readInt());
            }
            points.add(pointsArray);
        }
    }

    public void writeLog()
    {
        File file = new File ("C:\\!\\", "data.log");
        FileOutputStream fos;
        try {
            fos = new FileOutputStream(file, true);
            //fos = openFileOutput(Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().getAbsolutePath() + "/data.log", Context.MODE_APPEND);
            ObjectOutputStream os = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
            os.writeObject(this);
            os.close(); 
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public TestObject readLog()
    {
        TestObject testObject = new TestObject();
        testObject.points = new ArrayList<Point[]>();
        try{
            File file = new File ("C:\\!\\", "data.log");
            FileInputStream fis  = new FileInputStream(file);
            ObjectInputStream reader = new ObjectInputStream(fis);  
            testObject = (TestObject) reader.readObject();
            reader.close();
        } catch (Exception e) {
         //TODO Auto-generated catch block
         e.printStackTrace();
        }

        return testObject;
    }
}

And mine Main class

// ... IMPORT

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

            TestObject testObject = new TestObject();
            testObject.writeLog();
            testObject.readLog();

            try {
                Thread.sleep(100);
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

Again, this is just an example. Real application is for Android.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.ObjectInputStream;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import android.graphics.Point;
import android.os.Environment;

public class LogInfo implements Serializable{

    /**
     * 
     */
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 2281758309050283667L;
    transient public ArrayList<Point[][]> strokes;
    transient public LinkedList<byte[]> codes;

    public LogInfo()
    {
        strokes = new ArrayList<Point[][]>();
        codes = new LinkedList<byte[]>();
    }

    private void writeObject(ObjectOutputStream stream) throws IOException 
    {
        stream.defaultWriteObject();
        stream.writeInt(strokes.size());
        Point[][] pointsArray = null;
        for (int i = 0; i < strokes.size(); i++)
        {
            pointsArray = ((Point[][])strokes.get(i));
            stream.writeInt(pointsArray.length);
            for (int j = 0; j < pointsArray.length; j++)
            {
                stream.writeInt(pointsArray[j].length);
                for (int k = 0; k < pointsArray[j].length; k++)
                {
                    stream.writeInt(pointsArray[j][k].x);
                    stream.writeInt(pointsArray[j][k].y);
                    //stream.writeObject(elementData[i]);
                }
            }
        }

        int size = codes.size();

        stream.writeInt(size);
        for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            stream.write(codes.get(i));
        }
    }

    private void readObject(java.io.ObjectInputStream stream) throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException
    {
        strokes = new ArrayList<Point[][]>();
        stream.defaultReadObject();
        int strokesSize = stream.readInt();
        for (int i = 0; i < strokesSize; i++)
        {
            int arrayXSize = stream.readInt();
            Point[][] points = new Point[arrayXSize][];
            for (int j = 0; j < arrayXSize; j++)
            {
                int arrayYSize = stream.readInt();
                points[j] = new Point[arrayYSize];
                for (int k = 0; k < arrayYSize; k++)
                    points[j][k] = new Point(stream.readInt(), stream.readInt());
            }
            strokes.add(points);
        }

        int codesSize = stream.readInt();
        codes = new LinkedList<byte[]>();
        for (int i = 0; i < codesSize; i++)
        {
            byte[] buffer = new byte[3];
            stream.read(buffer, 0, 3);
            codes.add(buffer);
        }
    }

    public void writeLog()
    {
        File file = new File (Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().getAbsolutePath(), "data.log");
        FileOutputStream fos;
        try {
            fos = new FileOutputStream(file, true);
            //fos = openFileOutput(Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().getAbsolutePath() + "/data.log", Context.MODE_APPEND);
            ObjectOutputStream os = new ObjectOutputStream(fos);
            os.writeObject(this);
            os.close(); 
        } catch (IOException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public LogInfo readLog()
    {
        try{
            File file = new File (Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory().getAbsolutePath(), "data.log");
            FileInputStream fis  = new FileInputStream(file);
            ObjectInputStream reader = new ObjectInputStream(fis);  
            reader.readObject();
            reader.close();
        } catch (Exception e) {
         //TODO Auto-generated catch block
         e.printStackTrace();
        }

        return this;
    }
}

I call writeLog and readLog from different class, where I have an object instance.

// WRITE TO FILE
logInfo.writeLog();

// CLEAR LOG VARIABLE (NOT FILE)
delAllLogInfo();

// READ FROM FILE
LogInfo newLogInfo = logInfo.readLog();
share|improve this question
    
Where are you creating a static TestObject field? I may be missing something. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 13 '13 at 0:43
    
transient public ArrayList<Point[]> points; <<< this makes points become null /// transient static public ArrayList<Point[]> points <<< this works –  Marek May 13 '13 at 0:46
    
So it is the points field that you make null. This was not clear in your question: "If I don't make TestObject field as static" -- TestObject field != points field. Why are you using transient here anyway if you don't want it to be null? If you want it to be transient, then you'd better explicitly initialize the field after reading in the object perhaps by giving it a method, initPoints() and creating your List in the method. Whatever you do, don't use a static modifier. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 13 '13 at 0:47
    
The class that I use in this example is serializable, but in Android, Point class is not serializable. I need to override write and read method, so I don't want to call default methods - that is why I make it transient (it works with static object). As I understood your answer, I should always initialize the field that I read in readObject method? But could you explain to me why? I call this method from the object that is already created. And in readLog points field is not null, but just after entering readObject it becomes null. I really don't understand why –  Marek May 13 '13 at 1:04
    
You state that " I call this method from the object that is already created." Where? In the TestObject created just before the try block? Again per my answer, that object shouldn't even be created since it will just be over-written by the TestObject that you're de-serializing from the file. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 13 '13 at 1:05

3 Answers 3

  1. If I don't make TestObject field as static, testObject.points becomes null just on start of readObject method. I don't understand why. Could anyone give me good explanation?

Transient fields are deserialized as null. See the Object Serialization Specification. Static fields aren't deserialized at all, they remain at their current value.

  1. I would like to write one Object, and then another 2 Objects, and after this read them all (multiple object writing/reading - I want to create log file for Android).

If you have the same file open at all times this is a non-problem. If you don't, you need to open the file in append mode the second and subsequent times, and use a derived class of ObjectOutputStream that doesn't write a header the second and subsequent times.

share|improve this answer

I think I understand now. I should make my field not transient, and my read Object method should look like this: public TestObject readLog()

{
    try{
        File file = new File ("C:\\!\\", "data.log");
        FileInputStream fis  = new FileInputStream(file);
        ObjectInputStream reader = new ObjectInputStream(fis);  
        reader.readObject();
        reader.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
     //TODO Auto-generated catch block
     e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return this;
}

Am I correct? This seems to work

share|improve this answer
    
But do you get a serialization exception for trying to serialize a non-serializable class (Point)? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 13 '13 at 1:53
    
While working with TestObject I don't get it. But while working with Android Point I do.... What can I do? Let me show you my Android code. –  Marek May 13 '13 at 2:00
    
I uploaded android code. I think all I have to do is to make LogInfo class serializable, and then I would not have to play with overriding write and read methods. I don't know how to do it though... –  Marek May 13 '13 at 2:14
    
The result of reader.readObject() needs to be stored somewhere otherwise what was the point? –  EJP May 13 '13 at 3:16
    
reader.readObject() is use to read values from file, and after this I return this (my object). I don't need to store result of readObject() I think. But the code is not working. Can anyone check why? –  Marek May 13 '13 at 4:57

The key problem as I see it, is that you're creating a new TestObject object in the beginning of your readLog() method (and this method probably should be static) and giving it an ArrayList, but then in the mid body of the method, you replace this TestObject instance with another completely different one, one that comes via deserialization from a file, and seem to be expecting the new TestObject will retain the ArrayList that was created and added to the discarded TestObject. This won't work. The solution is to create the ArrayList after deserialization so that it is added to the TestObject that is actually returned from the method.

Consider changing this:

public TestObject readLog()
{
    // the two lines below are at best not necessary and at worst are misleading
    // since the deserialized TestObject will over-write anything done here
    TestObject testObject = new TestObject();  
    testObject.points = new ArrayList<Point[]>(); // again this will be discarded

    try{
        File file = new File ("C:\\!\\", "data.log");
        FileInputStream fis  = new FileInputStream(file);
        ObjectInputStream reader = new ObjectInputStream(fis);  
        testObject = (TestObject) reader.readObject();
        reader.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
     //TODO Auto-generated catch block
     e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return testObject;

to this:

public static TestObject readLog()
{
    TestObject testObject = null;
    ObjectInputStream reader = null;
    try{
        File file = new File ("C:\\!\\", "data.log");
        FileInputStream fis  = new FileInputStream(file);
        reader = new ObjectInputStream(fis);  
        testObject = (TestObject) reader.readObject();

        testObject.points = new ArrayList<Point[]>();  // **** placement is everything

        // reader.close();
    } catch (Exception e) {
     //TODO Auto-generated catch block
     e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
      if (reader != null) {
        reader.close();
      }
    }

    return testObject;

Or perhaps better, cleaner, give TestObject a public method, say initPoints() that has TestObject doing this itself.

public void initPoints() {
   points = new ArrayList<Point[]>();
}

And then call this after de-serializaing the object:

    testObject = (TestObject) reader.readObject();
    testObject.initPoints(); 

Whatever you do, making the points field static is a very very bad idea. Just don't even consider it.

Addendum: if your goal is to in fact save the Points data, then you may be best served by creating your own Point class and using it in a wrapper class for your current class.

share|improve this answer
    
Hovercraft Full Of Eels, by doing testObject = (TestObject) reader.readObject(); testObject.points = new ArrayList<Point[]>(); you are not actualy cleaning the points field and making it empty? What I understand from that code is that you read the object but then instead of saving it you just clean the points field and then return object with points field cleared... –  Marek May 13 '13 at 1:16
    
@Marek by doing testObject.points = new ArrayList<Point[]>(); you are not clearing anything. The points field before that line is null, and so you are just initializing it with an empty List. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 13 '13 at 1:23
    
I am so confused now. Why this field is null, if just in the line above I read the object from file, filling the points array with points? What I want to archive is to have an TestObject that I will be able to save and read from file without any problems. Maybe I do it completely wrong... But I am working on this for few days... and it is not working –  Marek May 13 '13 at 1:25
    
@Marek: it's null precisely because the field is transient. That is what transient means: the field is not serialized, and if not serialized, it certainly can't be de-serialized. That is why you must explicitly initialize it if you need to use it after de-serialization. Either that or create it in a lazy way (only when it is needed and only if it is null) if it makes sense for your program to do this. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 13 '13 at 1:26
    
So to make it work with my code, I should just make my field not transient? –  Marek May 13 '13 at 1:31

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