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So I have a Person class which contains info (firstName, lastName, mother, father, siblings, spouse) and I want to add the people of class Person to a Dictionary. I would like to comparatively parse through the dictionary to determine the relationship of objects (i.e. Given a person, find their cousins, siblings, etc.). My question is two fold: 1) How should I set up my Dictionary<...> and 2) How do I access the properties of each Person in the list? I first tried:

Dictionary<string, object> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, object>();  
var human = Person.AddPerson();  // Person.AddPerson() returns a new instance of a Person                               
dictionary.Add(human.name, human)    // setting the key to full name, value to Person object.

Should I try something like Dictionary<string, string> where <firstName, lastName> and once I get all the matches of people with the same name, then start searching the Dictionary for the mother, father, etc.??? This seems terribly slow and not the right way to go.
Edit: Here is my Person class and one of the other classes (bear in mind I'm just setting this up, I'll handle all the user inputs, etc later):

public class Person
{
    public string name { get; set;}
    public Mother mother { get; set; } 
    public Father father { get; set; }
    public Spouse spouse { get; set; }
    public Sibling sibling { get; set; }

    //List<Sibling> siblings = new List<Sibling>();

    public Person()
    { }

    public static Person AddPerson()
    {
        Person newPerson = new Person();
        Console.WriteLine("Enter name:");
        newPerson.name = Console.ReadLine().Trim();
        Console.WriteLine("Enter mother's name:");
        string input = Console.ReadLine().Trim();
        Mother mom = new Mother(input);
        newPerson.mother = mom;
        Console.WriteLine("Enter father's name:");
        string input1 = Console.ReadLine().Trim();
        Father dad = new Father(input1);
        newPerson.father = dad;
        Console.WriteLine("Enter sibling's name:");
        string input2 = Console.ReadLine().Trim();
        Sibling sib = new Sibling(input2);
        newPerson.sibling = sib;
        Console.WriteLine("Enter spouse's name:");
        string input3 = Console.ReadLine().Trim();
        Spouse partner = new Spouse(input3);
        newPerson.spouse = partner;

        return newPerson;
    }

}

public class Sibling : Person
{
    private string name;
    public Sibling(string Name)
    {
        name = Name;

    }
    public Sibling()
    { }
}

public class Mother : Person
{
    private string name;
    public Mother(string Name)
    {            
        //Mother mom = new Mother();
        name = Name;
    }
    public Mother()
    { }
}

public class Father : Person
{
    private string name;
    public Father(string Name)
    {
        name = Name;

    }
    public Father()
    { }
}

public class Spouse : Person
{
    private string name;
    public Spouse(string Name)
    {
        name = Name;

    }
    public Spouse()
    { }
}

}
share|improve this question
    
Whoops, my Dictionary declaration was: Dictionary< string, object > dictionary = new Dictionary< string, object >(); –  user2359626 May 13 '13 at 1:13
    
What is your demand?Something you can get a Person object by one of it's properties? –  jarvanJiang May 13 '13 at 1:20
    
Why a Dictionary? Sounds like you need a tree data structure. –  user1914530 May 13 '13 at 1:24
3  
Dictionary? I say you would be better off with a non-binary tree data structure. –  Alaa Masoud May 13 '13 at 1:25
1  
So this is homework? If so, it should be tagged as such. –  Craig Shearer May 13 '13 at 2:41

2 Answers 2

Importantly the key of a dictionary has to be unique.

So, if you suspect you would have more than one Person having the same first name then you might not be able to use only the first name as the key.

Therefore the key could be either a combination of Person properties like string.concat(firstName, lastName) again assuming this combination is unique Or some random number (like GUID).

Edit:

To help printing you could override your ToString, of each class. Below is an example

public class Father : Person
    {
        private string name;
        public Father(string Name)
        {
            name = Name;

        }
        public Father()
        { }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return this.name;
        }
    }

This should work then:

Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2}", person.Value.father, person.Value.mother, person.Value.sibling);
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I missed this point. But what would I use as the value? How do I access the properties of the object stored in the Dictionary? –  user2359626 May 13 '13 at 4:00
    
new Dictionary<string, Person> should be good.. I don't see a reason why you should use object (unless you hv asked to).. –  jacob aloysious May 13 '13 at 4:41
    
I'm still having issues trying to print out the properties to the Console line of each Person (mom, dad, etc.): Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2} {3}", person.Key, (Person)person.Value.father, person.Value.mother, person.Value.sibling); –  user2359626 May 13 '13 at 7:12
    
Never mind I solved it. I just needed to add another extension: person.Value.father.name –  user2359626 May 13 '13 at 7:17
    
@user2359626: hey, sry for the delay.. You could override ToString method to help you printing it on the console.. –  jacob aloysious May 13 '13 at 9:17

If you insist on using Dictionary,you should define dictionary as new Dictionary<string, Person>(),in this way you can loop dictionary like this:

foreach (var person in dictionary)
{
    if(person.Value.firstName=="somename")
    // do something
}

. Or you can use new Dictionary<string, object>() by convert object to Person like this

foreach (var person in dictionary)
{
    Person _person = (Person)person.Value;
    if(_person.firstName=="somename")
    // do something
}

.

I suggest the first solution,the second way will take extra cost on packing and unpacking.

Edit: my fault

share|improve this answer
1  
This won't compile. You "person" variable will have a KeyValuePair<string, Person> in it. –  appclay May 13 '13 at 3:15
    
"Packing and unpacking"? I assume you ment boxing and unboxing, which won't occur here. –  Christian.K May 13 '13 at 4:09
    
Using KeyValuePair<string, Person> I can't get the (Person)person.Value.Father/Mother/Sibling/Spouse to print: Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2} {3}", person.Key, (Person)person.Value.father, person.Value.mother, person.Value.sibling); // It just prints out Genealogy.Father, Genealogy.Mother, etc –  user2359626 May 13 '13 at 7:10
    
How do I print/access the properties (mom,dad,siblings,spouse) to the Console line? –  user2359626 May 13 '13 at 7:11

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