Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to understand the conceptual reason why OpenMP breaks loop vectorization. Also any suggestions for fixing this would be helpful. I am considering manually parallelizing this to fix this issue, but that would certainly not be elegant and result in a massive amount of code bloat, as my code consists of several such sections that lend themselves to vectorization and parallelization.

I am using

Microsoft (R) C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 17.00.60315.1 for x64

With OpenMP:

info C5002: loop not vectorized due to reason '502'

Without OpenMP:

info C5001: loop vectorized

The VS vectorization page says this error happens when:

Induction variable is stepped in some manner other than a simple +1

Can I force it to step in stride 1?

The loop

#pragma omp parallel for
for (int j = 0; j < H*W; j++)//A,B,C,D,IN are __restricted
{
    float Gs = D[j]-B[j];
    float Gc = A[j]-C[j];
    in[j]=atan2f(Gs,Gc);
}

Best Effort(?)

#pragma omp parallel
{// This seems to vectorize, but it still requires quite a lot of boiler code
    int middle = H*W/2;
    #pragma omp sections nowait
    {
        #pragma omp section
        for (int j = 0; j < middle; j++)
        {
            float Gs = D[j]-B[j];
            float Gc = A[j]-C[j];
            in[j]=atan2f(Gs,Gc);
        }
        #pragma omp section
        for (int j = middle; j < H*W; j++)
        {
            float Gs = D[j]-B[j];
            float Gc = A[j]-C[j];
            in[j]=atan2f(Gs,Gc);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I'm surprised that Visual Studio vectorizes this due to the atan2f function. I have not tried to compile it with Visual Studio yet but with GCC it does not vectorize (with or without OpenMP). In my experience GCC auto-vectorizes better than Visual Studio. The bounty question you asked recently would not been have as interesting if you had used GCC because GCC hat no trouble vectorizing the loop with shorts. But maybe this is an example where Visual Studio's auto-vectorization is better. – user2088790 May 13 '13 at 17:49
    
I tried this in Visual Studio. It vectorizes like you said. I'm really surprised by this. I have not tested the performance. I wonder what Visual Studio is doing for the atan2f function. Does it really have a SSE/AVX atan2f function? – user2088790 May 14 '13 at 12:48
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I recommend that you do the vectorization manually. One reason is that auto-vectorization does not seem to handle carried loop dependencies well (loop unrolling).

To avoid code bloat and arcane intrinsics I use Agner Fog's vectorclass. In my experience it's just as fast as using intrinsics and it automatically takes advantage of SSE2-AVX2 (AVX2 is tested on a Intel emulator) depending on how you compile. I have written GEMM code using the vectorclass that works on SSE2 up to AVX2 and when I run on a system with AVX my code is already faster than Eigen which only uses SSE. Here is your function with the vectorclass (I did not try unrolling the loop).

#include "omp.h"
#include "math.h"

#include "vectorclass.h"
#include "vectormath.h"

void loop(const int H, const int W, const int outer_stride, float *A, float *B, float *C, float *D, float* in) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for (int j = 0; j < H*W; j+=8)//A,B,C,D,IN are __restricted, W*H must be a multiple of 8
    {
        Vec8f Gs = Vec8f().load(&D[j]) - Vec8f().load(&B[j]);
        Vec8f Gc = Vec8f().load(&A[j]) - Vec8f().load(&C[j]);
        Vec8f invec = atan(Gs, Gc);
        invec.store(&in[j]);
    }

}

When doing the vectorization yourself you have to be careful with array bounds. In the function above H*W needs to be a multiple of 8. There are several solutions for that but the easiest and most efficient solution is to make the arrays (A,B,C,D,in) a bit larger (maximum 7 floats larger) if necessary to be a multiple of 8. However, another solution is to use the following code which does not require W*H to be a multiple of 8 but it's not as pretty.

#define ROUND_DOWN(x, s) ((x) & ~((s)-1))
void loop_fix(const int H, const int W, const int outer_stride, float *A, float *B, float *C, float *D, float* in) {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for (int j = 0; j < ROUND_DOWN(H*W,8); j+=8)//A,B,C,D,IN are __restricted
    {
        Vec8f Gs = Vec8f().load(&D[j]) - Vec8f().load(&B[j]);
        Vec8f Gc = Vec8f().load(&A[j]) - Vec8f().load(&C[j]);
        Vec8f invec = atan(Gs, Gc);
        invec.store(&in[j]);
    }
    for(int j=ROUND_DOWN(H*W,8); j<H*W; j++) {
        float Gs = D[j]-B[j];
        float Gc = A[j]-C[j];
        in[j]=atan2f(Gs,Gc);
    }

}

One challenge with doing the vectorization yourself is finding a SIMD math library (e.g. for atan2f). The vectorclass supports 3 options. Non-SIMD, LIBM by AMD, and SVML by Intel (I used the non-SIMD option in the code above). SIMD math libraries for SSE and AVX

Some last comments you might want to consider. Visual Studio has auto-parallelization (off by default) as well as auto-vectorization (on by default, at least in release mode). You can try this instead of OpenMP to reduce code bloat. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh872235.aspx

Additionally, Microsoft has the parallel patterns library. It's worth looking into since Microsoft's OpenMP support is limited. It's nearly as easy as OpenMP to use. It's possible that one of these options works better with auto-vectorization (though I doubt it). Like I said, I would do the vectorization manually with the vectorclass.

share|improve this answer

You may try loop unrolling instead of sections:

#pragma omp parallel for
for (int j = 0; j < H*W; j += outer_stride)//A,B,C,D,IN are __restricted
{
  for (int ii = 0; ii < outer_stride; ii++) {
    float Gs = D[j+ii]-B[j+ii];
    float Gc = A[j+ii]-C[j+ii];
    in[j+ii] = atan2f(Gs,Gc);
  }
}

where outer_stride is a suitable multiple of your SIMD line. Also, you may find this answer useful.

share|improve this answer
    
I like your suggestion. I tried it in GCC but it does not vectorize at all due to the atan2f function. I'm surprised that GCC does not vectorize while Visual Studio does. I compiled with "g++ foo.cpp -o foo -O3 -fopenmp -ftree-vectorizer-verbose=2 -ffast-math" – user2088790 May 13 '13 at 17:45
    
I think loop unrolling causes the same troubles that the original loop had. Specifically, VS isn't sure of the stride, and from the performance it seems the loops were not vectorized. – Mikhail May 13 '13 at 22:36
    
I tried your suggestion in VS as well and it does not vectorize. Actually, I'm surprised the original loop vectorizes. I would be really surprised if Visual Studio has a SSE/AVX version of atan2f. – user2088790 May 14 '13 at 13:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.