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I am trying to make a listbox in a winform to use a list of declared objects as the content source. Choosing an object should list its properties in a nearby text box that reads from the properties of that object. An object for the list looks something like this:

public Form1()
{
    Element gold = new Element();
    gold.Property = "Soft";
    gold.Metal = true;
    gold.Name = "Gold";

    InitializeComponent();
}

I was told that putting this in my main form was the way to go with this. What I have attempted so far is giving a name string that the listbox will use to name the object that the user will select, and the other two properties (gold.Property = "Soft"; and gold.Metal = true; are meant to go in the nearby textbox when the item is selected in the listbox). I don't really know how to do this, so any sort of help for this would be appreciated. At the base, just knowing how to get the listbox to find the object I made for it and then list it, would be great.

Also, yes, this is for an assignment. So the things I have outlined need to be done in that way...there is more to the assignment itself, but where I am stuck is here.

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2 Answers 2

Use List<Element> elements to store your element, then do a loop on each element and add its name to the listbox.

Add event handler to your listbox selected index changed, This code should do it. (Remember to check whether the selected index is -1 or not)

txtName.Text = elements[listbox.SelectedIndex].Name;
txtProperty.Text = elements[listbox.SelectedIndex].Property;
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Without knowing more of your requirements, I can only guess that the assignment wants you to directly add instances of Element() to your ListBox. You can override ToString() in your Element() class to control how the ListBox will display those instances. Return the Name() property will work quite nicely. Wire up the SelectedIndexChanged() event of the ListBox and cast SelectedItem() back to Element() so you can extract the other two values. This might look something like:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        listBox1.SelectedIndexChanged += new EventHandler(listBox1_SelectedIndexChanged);

        Element element = new Element();
        element.Property = "Soft";
        element.Metal = true;
        element.Name = "Gold";
        listBox1.Items.Add(element);

        element = new Element();
        element.Property = "Indestructible";
        element.Metal = true;
        element.Name = "Adamantium";
        listBox1.Items.Add(element);

        element = new Element();
        element.Property = "Liquid";
        element.Metal = true;
        element.Name = "Mercury";
        listBox1.Items.Add(element);

        element = new Element();
        element.Property = "Fluffy";
        element.Metal = false;
        element.Name = "Kitten";
        listBox1.Items.Add(element);
    }

    void listBox1_SelectedIndexChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (listBox1.SelectedIndex != -1)
        {
            Element element = (Element)listBox1.SelectedItem;
            label1.Text = "Property: " + element.Property;
            label2.Text = "Metal: " + element.Metal.ToString();
        }
    }
}

public class Element
{
    public string Property;
    public bool Metal;
    public string Name;

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Name;
    }
}
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This was incredibly useful, and gave me a lot to understand and work with in terms of adding new items. However, when I first added an "element" ("gold"), it gave me the whole line of code in the list. So, I did listbox1.Items.Add(element.Name); and that gave me the name instead. What you gave me is really good for what I am doing, though. Thanks very much! I would upvote this if I could. I will let you know once I implement it if you answered my problem. Thanks, once again. –  Malic Acid May 13 '13 at 3:32
    
Note how I overrode ToString() in the Element() class at the bottom of the example. This is what controls how the ListBox displays your instance. Without that, it simply displays the fully qualified name of your class, which isn't very helpful. I set it up to return the Name() property. If you instead add element.Name to the ListBox then you will lose the other associated pieces of data since all you are adding is a plain old string. You must use listBox1.Items.Add(element) so that all the data is in the ListBox (even if you only see the Name being displayed there). –  Idle_Mind May 13 '13 at 4:36

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