Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What would be the best way in Python to parse out chunks of text contained in matching brackets?

"{ { a } { b } { { { c } } } }"

should initially return:

[ "{ a } { b } { { { c } } }" ]

putting that as an input should return:

[ "a", "b", "{ { c } }" ]

which should return:

[ "{ c }" ]

[ "c" ]

[]
share|improve this question
1  
I'm curious. In your last example, would it return [ "{ c }" ] and then that would return [ "c" ] and then that would return [ ]? –  Thomas Owens Oct 30 '09 at 18:20
    
Shouldn't second statement be ["{ a } { b } { { { c } } }"] instead? –  JP. Oct 30 '09 at 18:23
    
The second statement is [ "{ a } { b } { { { c } } }" ], exactly what you wrote... I'm going to complete the entire sequence so people know exactly what I want –  Martin Oct 30 '09 at 18:32
1  
I think you want [ "{ a } { b } { { { c } } }" ] to go to [ "a", "b", "{ { c } }" ], am i right? –  Claudiu Oct 30 '09 at 18:36
    
Yes you are, I'll go edit... –  Martin Oct 30 '09 at 18:45

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Pseudocode:

For each string in the array:
    Find the first '{'. If there is none, leave that string alone.
    Init a counter to 0. 
    For each character in the string:  
        If you see a '{', increment the counter.
        If you see a '}', decrement the counter.
        If the counter reaches 0, break.
    Here, if your counter is not 0, you have invalid input (unbalanced brackets)
    If it is, then take the string from the first '{' up to the '}' that put the
     counter at 0, and that is a new element in your array.
share|improve this answer
    
Wonderful! I had the designs of something like this in my head, but not quite so well formulated. Out of interest, is there a formal name for this kind of parser? I'm familiar with recursive descent parsers from a module we did at uni, but not this kind. –  Martin Oct 30 '09 at 18:37
    
I'm not sure if it has a name. This might just be a short-circuited way of doing parens matching, without doing a full-blown recursive descent parser. Maybe someone else knows better. –  Claudiu Oct 30 '09 at 18:38
    
To add: the counter represents how deep in the 'recursion' you are, without having to do function calls. –  Claudiu Oct 30 '09 at 18:40
    
Your indentation is off. As written, with the input "{a}{b}" you will return "a{b}" and not "ab". The "Here" part needs to be indented. This is Python and indentation counts. –  jmucchiello Oct 31 '09 at 0:06
    
No, I think his indentation is correct. If the loop terminates with the counter equal to zero, then all is fine and a matched bracket pair has been found. However if it terminates with counter != zero then the loop simply terminated because there were no more characters, and thus the brackets were unmatched. –  Martin Nov 1 '09 at 11:58

Or this pyparsing version:

>>> from pyparsing import nestedExpr
>>> txt = "{ { a } { b } { { { c } } } }"
>>>
>>> nestedExpr('{','}').parseString(txt).asList()
[[['a'], ['b'], [[['c']]]]]
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
pythonhosted.org//pyparsing FTW:-) Thanks for this, and for pyparsing. –  BradHards Feb 1 at 8:54
    
This is far more readable than the algorithm in the accepted answer, and I also trust a widely used (and therefore tested) library over my own home grown solution. One very important thing to note: if your entire expression is not enclosed by a pair of grouping symbols, then this will only process the first grouped expression. If you always want to process the entire expression, you may be able to force this by adding an outer pair of grouping symbols when they aren't already present. –  jpmc26 May 20 at 1:40

Parse using lepl (installable via $ easy_install lepl):

from lepl import Any, Delayed, Node, Space

expr = Delayed()
expr += '{' / (Any() | expr[1:,Space()[:]]) / '}' > Node

print expr.parse("{{a}{b}{{{c}}}}")[0]

Output:

Node
 +- '{'
 +- Node
 |   +- '{'
 |   +- 'a'
 |   `- '}'
 +- Node
 |   +- '{'
 |   +- 'b'
 |   `- '}'
 +- Node
 |   +- '{'
 |   +- Node
 |   |   +- '{'
 |   |   +- Node
 |   |   |   +- '{'
 |   |   |   +- 'c'
 |   |   |   `- '}'
 |   |   `- '}'
 |   `- '}'
 `- '}'
share|improve this answer
1  
reminds me of Parsec –  Claudiu Oct 31 '09 at 7:38

I'm kind of new to Python, so go easy on me, but here is an implementation that works:

def balanced_braces(args):
    parts = []
    for arg in args:
        if '{' not in arg:
            continue
        chars = []
        n = 0
        for c in arg:
            if c == '{':
                if n > 0:
                    chars.append(c)
                n += 1
            elif c == '}':
                n -= 1
                if n > 0:
                    chars.append(c)
                elif n == 0:
                    parts.append(''.join(chars).lstrip().rstrip())
                    chars = []
            elif n > 0:
                chars.append(c)
    return parts

t1 = balanced_braces(["{{ a } { b } { { { c } } } }"]);
print t1
t2 = balanced_braces(t1)
print t2
t3 = balanced_braces(t2)
print t3
t4 = balanced_braces(t3)
print t4

Output:

['{ a } { b } { { { c } } }']
['a', 'b', '{ { c } }']
['{ c }']
['c']
share|improve this answer

If you want to use a parser (lepl in this case), but still want the intermediate results rather than a final parsed list, then I think this is the kind of thing you were looking for:

>>> nested = Delayed()
>>> nested += "{" + (nested[1:,...]|Any()) + "}"
>>> split = (Drop("{") & (nested[:,...]|Any()) & Drop("}"))[:].parse
>>> split("{{a}{b}{{{c}}}}")
['{a}{b}{{{c}}}']
>>> split("{a}{b}{{{c}}}")
['a', 'b', '{{c}}']
>>> split("{{c}}")
['{c}']
>>> split("{c}")
['c']

That might look opaque at first, but it's fairly simple really :o)

nested is a recursive definition of a matcher for nested brackets (the "+" and [...] in the definition keep everything as a single string after it has been matched). Then split says match as many as possible ("[:]") of something that is surrounded by "{" ... "}" (which we discard with "Drop") and contains either a nested expression or any letter.

Finally, here's a lepl version of the "all in one" parser that gives a result in the same format as the pyparsing example above, but which (I believe) is more flexible about how spaces appear in the input:

>>> with Separator(~Space()[:]):
...     nested = Delayed()
...     nested += Drop("{") & (nested[1:] | Any()) & Drop("}") > list
...
>>> nested.parse("{{ a }{ b}{{{c}}}}")
[[['a'], ['b'], [[['c']]]]]
share|improve this answer

You could also parse them all at once, though I find the {a} to mean "a" rather than ["a"] slightly weird. If I've understood the format correctly:

import re
import sys


_mbrack_rb = re.compile("([^{}]*)}") # re.match doesn't have a pos parameter
def mbrack(s):
  """Parse matching brackets.

  >>> mbrack("{a}")
  'a'
  >>> mbrack("{{a}{b}}")
  ['a', 'b']
  >>> mbrack("{{a}{b}{{{c}}}}")
  ['a', 'b', [['c']]]

  >>> mbrack("a")
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ValueError: expected left bracket
  >>> mbrack("{a}{b}")
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ValueError: more than one root
  >>> mbrack("{a")
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ValueError: expected value then right bracket
  >>> mbrack("{a{}}")
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ValueError: expected value then right bracket
  >>> mbrack("{a}}")
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ValueError: unbalanced brackets (found right bracket)
  >>> mbrack("{{a}")
  Traceback (most recent call last):
  ValueError: unbalanced brackets (not enough right brackets)
  """
  stack = [[]]
  i, end = 0, len(s)
  while i < end:
    if s[i] != "{":
      raise ValueError("expected left bracket")
    elif i != 0 and len(stack) == 1:
      raise ValueError("more than one root")
    while i < end and s[i] == "{":
      L = []
      stack[-1].append(L)
      stack.append(L)
      i += 1
    stack.pop()
    stack[-1].pop()
    m = _mbrack_rb.match(s, i)
    if m is None:
      raise ValueError("expected value then right bracket")
    stack[-1].append(m.group(1))
    i = m.end(0)
    while i < end and s[i] == "}":
      if len(stack) == 1:
        raise ValueError("unbalanced brackets (found right bracket)")
      stack.pop()
      i += 1
  if len(stack) != 1:
    raise ValueError("unbalanced brackets (not enough right brackets)")
  return stack[0][0]


def main(args):
  if args:
    print >>sys.stderr, "unexpected arguments: %r" % args
  import doctest
  r = doctest.testmod()
  print r
  return r[0]

if __name__ == "__main__":
  sys.exit(main(sys.argv[1:]))
share|improve this answer

Cleaner solution. This will find return the string enclosed in the outermost bracket. If None is returned, there was no match.

def findBrackets( aString ):
   if '{' in aString:
      match = aString.split('{',1)[1]
      open = 1
      for index in xrange(len(match)):
         if match[index] in '{}':
            open = (open + 1) if match[index] == '{' else (open - 1)
         if not open:
            return match[:index]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.