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How do I sort a list of strings by key=len first then by key=str? I've tried the following but it's not giving me the desired sort:

>>> ls = ['foo','bar','foobar','barbar']
>>> 
>>> for i in sorted(ls):
...     print i
... 
bar
barbar
foo
foobar
>>>
>>> for i in sorted(ls, key=len):
...     print i
... 
foo
bar
foobar
barbar
>>> 
>>> for i in sorted(ls, key=str):
...     print i
... 
bar
barbar
foo
foobar

I need to get:

bar
foo
barbar
foobar
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4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Define a key function that returns a tuple in which the first item is len(str) and the second one is the string itself. Tuples are then compared lexicographically. That is, first the lengths are compared; if they are equal then the strings get compared.

In [1]: ls = ['foo','bar','foobar','barbar']

In [2]: sorted(ls, key=lambda s: (len(s), s))
Out[2]: ['bar', 'foo', 'barbar', 'foobar']
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just 2c if performance matters: a standalone function should be much faster than lambda. –  bereal May 13 '13 at 6:25
    
@root: really? Why? –  Eric May 13 '13 at 6:51
2  
@Eric - Duh... After testing it - I have to say there really isn't any performance difference. –  root May 13 '13 at 7:02
1  
Hm after testing it, I revoke my comment, no difference indeed. Was some bias of mine. –  bereal May 13 '13 at 7:54

The answer from root is correct, but you don't really need a lambda:

>>> def key_function(x):
        return len(x), str(x)

>>> sorted(['foo','bar','foobar','barbar'], key=key_function)
['bar', 'foo', 'barbar', 'foobar']

In addtion, there is a alternate approach takes advantage of sort stability which lets you sort in multiple passes (with the secondary key first):

>>> ls = ['foo','bar','foobar','barbar']
>>> ls.sort(key=str)                       # secondary key
>>> ls.sort(key=len)                       # primary key

See the Sorting HOWTO for a good tutorial on Python sorting techniques.

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9  
Well, I would say there is no need for a full blown function here :) (BTW, you have a missing , key=key_function)) –  root May 13 '13 at 6:38
3  
When faced with a beginner question, I typically won't use a lambda in the answer and instead will use the most plain formulation of the answer. If someone is asking this question about sorting and key functions, then it suggest that they are not already comfortable with lambda. –  Raymond Hettinger May 13 '13 at 7:56
1  
Point taken. I suppose I read it as of the use of lambdas in this context should be somehow discouraged in general. –  root May 13 '13 at 8:18
1  
+1 for the stable sort –  wim May 13 '13 at 14:41

If you don't want to use lambda:

from operator import itemgetter
ls = ['foo','bar','foobar','barbar']
print sorted([ [x,len(x)] for x in ls ] ,key=itemgetter(1,0))
# print [s[0] for s in sorted([ [x,len(x)] for x in ls ] ,key=itemgetter(1,0))]
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3  
This is uglier than the lambda because you are introducing cruft to the result which requires an extra [0] to access the result –  jamylak May 13 '13 at 6:30
    
Yes, this has x2 execution time compared to lambda –  perreal May 13 '13 at 6:59
    
Also, for me the execution time with key_function is 1.2 times the lambda version –  perreal May 13 '13 at 7:03

Another form that works without a lambda:

>>> [t[1] for t in sorted((len(s),s) for s in ls)]
['bar', 'foo', 'barbar', 'foobar']
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2  
key was made so you don't need to use DSU –  jamylak May 13 '13 at 6:31

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