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I am trying to trigger behaviour on a collection by triggering an event elsewhere in my app. I am pretty new to backbone, so probably have all my syntax wrong, but this seems like it should work

fiddle

var Test = Backbone.Model.extend({
});
var Tests = Backbone.Collection.extend({
        model: Test,
        events: {
            "testEvent":"testResponce"
        },
        testResponce: function(){
            alert('hello world');
        }
    });



var myTest = new Test();

myTest.trigger('testEvent');

Can this be done? Where am I going wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to call a particular method of your collection using testEvent event then you can take this path also. Working Demo

var Test = Backbone.Model.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.on('testEvent', function() {
            console.log(this.collection);
            this.collection.testResponce();
        });
    }
});
var Tests = Backbone.Collection.extend({
        model: Test,
        testResponce: function(){
            alert('hello world');
        }
    });

var myTest = new Test();
var testList = new Tests([myTest]);
myTest.trigger('testEvent');
share|improve this answer
    
this does answer the question, so is a worthy recipient of the tick. However, moving forward I actually intend to instantiate a model from the event, so this will create a loop?! I guess I can create two model classes, one for triggering and one for actual data storage, but it strikes me as overkill to have an entire Backbone model when all I actually want is the trigger method and to not pollute the global namespace. –  Mild Fuzz May 13 '13 at 14:00
    
If you want to create another model on trigger of testEvent event then you can easily create a new model in your testResponse method and add it to your collection. There is no looping at all. May be there is a use case and on that basis you have framed this question So please let me know how there is looping involved in it. –  blunderboy May 13 '13 at 17:06
    
Ahh, I see, sorry, misinterpreted the code. There will be duplicate event bindings though, no? –  Mild Fuzz May 13 '13 at 19:55
    
@MildFuzz No there won't be duplicate event bindings. Every model is listening to an event testEvent and this event gets triggered on the model itself. In the event handler, its upto you what you want to do. In this case, we are calling a method of collection which is perfectly fine. In this case, we have defined an anonymous method as the event handler. testResponce is just an another method not an event handler and is called from the anonymous event handler. May be you can explain me How are you seeing a duplicate event binding so that I can answer your query better. –  blunderboy May 14 '13 at 3:45
1  
In this fiddle jsfiddle.net/blunderboy/atb2t/10 there is no binding on model, however there is binding on collection and which is you want. There is already a collection object associated with each model and we are just triggering an event on collection. There is only one event binding now and that is only on collection. No binding is there on models. –  blunderboy May 14 '13 at 10:20

The event that you are triggering will have to be caught inside the model.

If you want to catch an event inside collection you can use Backbone.on and Backbone.trigger OR collection.on and collection.trigger

Please check the fiddle below for an example

fiddle

var Test = Backbone.Model.extend({});
var Tests = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    model: Test,
    initialize: function () {
        Backbone.on('testEvent', function () {
            alert('event handled in collection');
        });
    }
});


var myCollection = new Tests();
var myTest = new Test();

Backbone.trigger('testEvent');

UPDATE

Collection has an initialize method which you can use to register events on. Later you can trigger these events from their instances.

Other way as NULL suggested is to do it like below.

var Test = Backbone.Model.extend({});
var Tests = Backbone.Collection.extend({
    model: Test,
    initialize: function () {
        this.on('testEvent', function () {
            alert('event handled in collection');
        });
    }
});


var myCollection = new Tests();
var myTest = new Test();

myCollection.trigger('testEvent');
share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't sugest to route the events over the global namespace. Use this.on and this.trigger where this refers to an instance of Backbone.Collection –  null May 13 '13 at 8:52

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