Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'll simplify my problem of hundreds of classes to a count of two and try to explain what I mean:

class Base {
};
class A: public Base {
};
class B: public Base{
};

static Base* foo (int bar){

    switch (bar) {
        case 0:
            return new A();
            break;              
        case 1:
            return new B();
            break;
        default:
            return new Base();
    }
}

I want to instantiate objects according to the value of bar. I just feel switch-case isn't the best way in C++ to do so for way more inheritors of Base .

Edit: going with the std::map approach I came up with this:

struct Dictionary {
    typedef Base* (Dictionary::*FunctionPointer)(void);
    std::map <int, FunctionPointer> fmap;

    Dictionary() {
        fmap.insert(std::make_pair(0, new A()));
        fmap.insert(std::make_pair(1, new B()));
    }

    Base* Call (const int i){
        FunctionPointer fp = NULL;
        fp = fmap[i];
        if (fp){
            return (this->*fp)();
        } else {
            return new Base();
        }
    }
};

static Dictionary dictionary;
share|improve this question
1  
It is OK, but you probably want to return std::unique_ptr<Base>. –  juanchopanza May 13 '13 at 8:52
2  
That's the way to do it. This is commonly known as the factory pattern. –  Luchian Grigore May 13 '13 at 8:52
1  
@EugenRieck why would that be better? –  Luchian Grigore May 13 '13 at 8:52
1  
@LuchianGrigore 1. it is easier to maintain, 2. it can be dynamically modified ... say "plugin infrastructure" –  Eugen Rieck May 13 '13 at 8:53
1  
One of the acceptable places to have a switch is in a factory. Alternatively you could use a map between a string and prototype objects. –  Peter Wood May 13 '13 at 8:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A lot depends on the circumstances, but the most frequent solution is probably to use a static instance of a map to factory functions. If the key type of the map is a small integer value, as in your example, the "map" can be nothing more than a C style array:

static Base*
foo( int bar )
{
    static Base* (*factories[])() = [ &aFactory, &bFactory ];
    return bar >= 0 && bar < size( factories )
        ? (*factories[bar])()
        : baseFactory();
}

More generally, you can use an std::map (to discriminate on any imaginable type), and you can map to static instances of factory objects, rather than factory functions, if different keys should result in the same type, but with different arguments.

EDIT:

Some suggestions to improve your Dictionary::Call function:

Base* Dictionary::Call( int i ) const
{
    std::map<int, FunctionPointer>::const_iterator
                        entry = fmap.find( i );
    return entry == fmap.end()
        ? new Base()
        : (this->*(entry->second))();
}

I've made the function const, since it doesn't modify anything, and most impprtantly, I use std::map<>::find, to avoid inserting extra entries into the map if the object isn't already there.

And since I'm adding the const, you'll have to update the typedef:

typedef Base* (Dictionary::*FunctionPointer)() const;

Another suggestion: unless the factory functions need access Dictionary, make them static. The syntax is a lot simpler (and it will probably also improve performance). static changes the typedef again:

Also: in the constructor, new A() is not a function constructing a new object. There may be something to facilitate this in C++11 (between lambda and std::function), but otherwise, you'll still have to write each of the factory functions by hand. Or you could use a template:

template <typename Target>
Base* construct() const
{
    return new Target();
}

Dictionary()
{
    fmap.insert( std::make_pair( 0, &Dictionary::construct<A> ) );
    //  ...
}

Or if you make them static:

typedef Base* (*FunctionPointer)();

//  ...
template <typename Target>
static Base* construct()
{
    return new Target();
}

Base* Dictionary::Call( int i ) const
{
    std::map<int, FunctionPointer>::const_iterator
                        entry = fmap.find( i );
    return entry == fmap.end()
        ? new Base()
        : (*entry->second)();
}

You'll notice how the static simplifies the declarations (and the function call through the pointer—your pointer to member function has become a simple pointer to function).

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for your answer. since i have ~250 function calls, i took your std::map approach and came up with the edit. happy for any suggestions. –  dos May 14 '13 at 10:51
    
@dos One suggestion: I'd use std::map<>::find to do the lookup, rather than std::map<>::operator[]. The second will insert new entries into the map (with a null pointer) if it doesn't find one; the first won't. I've edited to add some further suggestions. –  James Kanze May 14 '13 at 11:39
    
making the Call function const results in a "Call to pointer member function of type 'Base ()' drops 'const' qualifier". Using a template for the constructor functions results in a 'semantic issue' : "In instantiation of function template specialization 'std::pair<const int, Base *(Dictionary::)()>::pair<int, Base ()()>' requested here" –  dos May 14 '13 at 16:17
    
@dos Yes. You'll have to propagate it everywhere: in the typedef and in the template function. –  James Kanze May 14 '13 at 16:24
    
would you mind editing your post accordingly? I'm a little helpless regarding the template calls. Thank you very much for your effort. –  dos May 14 '13 at 17:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.