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How can Pass List to a constructor

I trying like this

 private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        step2 st2 = new step2(list);
    }    

But what to write in constructor definition

 public step2()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

Any suggestion is welcome

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4  
Change it to public step2(List<string> list) –  I4V May 13 '13 at 8:54
    
But what do you want to do with this list in constructor? –  Kirill Bestemyanov May 13 '13 at 8:55

9 Answers 9

You need to define a parameter in the constructor. For example.

 public step2(List<Type> list) 
 {

 }

Where Type is your list type, i.e. List<string>

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It is that simple

public step2(List<string> list)
{
    InitializeComponent();
}

I highly recommend to read a book about the basics of c#

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You need to provide a constructor for the step2 type that takes a List<T>

public step2()
{
    InitializeComponent();
}

Should be:

public step2(List<T> list)
{
    //Do something with list
    InitializeComponent();
}

Constructors C# Programming guide should come in handy

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Basically:

public step2(List<Type> list) {

}

But good practice is to set IList as an argument type.

public step2(IList<Type> list) {

}

You can read there about passing interfaces instead of object.

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You need to pass to constructor either List or any class/interface that List inhereit from. For example IList will be good as well.

public step2(List<T> list){ }


public step2(IList<T> list){ }

T is a Type.

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You could even just do:

public step2(List<T> list){}

To use the function as a generic funciton for all List item :)

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This should be your class constructor to accommodate List:

public step2(List<T> list)
{
    InitializeComponent();
}

And you can call this class as follows:

List<string> myList = new List<string>();  // You can choose your own data type.
step2 obj = new step2(myList); 
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public class A

    {
    List<string> listParam1 = new List<string>();

    public A(List<string> ListParam)
    {
        listParam1 = ListParam;
    }

}

This is how a parameterized constructor looks like.

And you can initialize it as following:

    List<string> param = new List<string>();
    param.Add("One");
    param.Add("Two");
    A obj = new A(param);

Let me know if this was helpful.

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The answer may depend on what class step2 inherits from or how you use it. In other words - if your class step2 needs a default constructor you should not replace the constructor but add another one:

public step2()
{
    InitializeComponent();
}

public step2(IList<String> stringList) : this()
{
    // do something with stringList
}
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