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I've a 8x8 matrix, and after choosing the row I desire, I want to get the three minimum elements of it, and choose one of this three randomly. The thing is that I'dont know how to handle those three elements. I just know how to get the minimum element, that is the following code.

int piezas[8][8] = {
0, 2, 2, 5, 3, 2, 1, 1,
0, 4, 5, 2, 4, 3, 0, 0,
0, 4, 2, 2, 1, 2, 3, 2,
0, 3, 1, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4,
2, 5, 6, 5, 3, 1, 2, 7,
8, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2, 1, 1,
1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 6, 3, 4,
};

int myrow = 3; // the row I want to analyze
int index;
int min=0;

for (index=0;index<8;index++) {
    printf("%d", piezas[myrow][index] );
    if(piezas[myrow][index]<min)
        min=piezas[myrow][index];
    printf("\t\t");
}
printf("min: %d", min);

The output I want to have is, if the initial matrix is:

int piezas[8][8] = {
0, 2, 2, 5, 3, 2, 1, 1,
0, 4, 5, 2, 4, 3, 0, 0,
0, 4, 2, 2, 1, 2, 3, 2,
0, 3, 1, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4,
2, 5, 6, 5, 3, 1, 2, 7,
8, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2, 1, 1,
1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 6, 3, 4,
};

And I choose row number 3:

0, 3, 1, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4,

The algorithm must choose

0, 1, 1

And choose randomly one of these three.

Can someone give me any ideas of how can I do it? I'm stuck with this since early this morning. Thanks

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#define SIZE_ROW 8
#define N_MIN 3


int piezas[SIZE_ROW][SIZE_ROW] = {
0, 2, 2, 5, 3, 2, 1, 1,
0, 4, 5, 2, 4, 3, 0, 0,
0, 4, 2, 2, 1, 2, 3, 2,
0, 3, 1, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4,
2, 5, 6, 5, 3, 1, 2, 7,
8, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2, 1, 1,
1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 6, 3, 4,
};

int sort(const void *x, const void *y) {
  return (*(int*)x - *(int*)y);
}

int* sort_array(int* row, int size_row){
    int* output = (int*) calloc(size_row, sizeof(int) );
    memcpy(output, row, size_row*sizeof(int) ); // copy array
    qsort (output, size_row, sizeof (int), sort);

    return output;

}

int random_pick(int* array, int size_row){
    return array[ rand() % size_row ]; // possible buffer overflow if size_row too big.
}

int main(void){
    srand(time(NULL));

    int myrow = 3; // the row I want to analyze
    int* sorted_row = NULL;


    int i,j;


    sorted_row = sort_array(piezas[myrow],SIZE_ROW );

    printf("N mins : \n");
    for(i=0;i<N_MIN;i++){
        printf(" %d ", sorted_row[i] );
    }
    printf("\n");

    printf("Random Pick : %d \n", random_pick(sorted_row, N_MIN) );


}
share|improve this answer

I would try sorting the row and random one of the three first elements then.

// integer comparator
int compare(int * a, int * b) {return *a - *b;}

// allocate memory to hold the copy
int rowCopy[sizeof(piezas[myrow])/sizeof(int)];
// copy the row
memcpy(rowCopy, piezas[myrow], sizeof(piezas[myrow]));
// sort it
qsort(rowCopy, sizeof(piezas[myrow])/sizeof(int), sizeof(rowCopy[0]), compare);
// initialize the random number generator
srand(time(NULL));
// return randomly one of the first 3 elements
return rowCopy[rand() % 3]
share|improve this answer
    
Everything seems fine, but I'm having problems with the qsort line. This is the error it's showing: main.cpp:64: error: invalid conversion from 'int (*)(int*, int*)' to 'int (*)(const void*, const void*)' main.cpp:64: error: initializing argument 4 of 'void qsort(void*, size_t, size_t, int (*)(const void*, const void*))' – Borja May 13 '13 at 9:24
    
yeah, this is a warning that I defined the comparator not as a real prototype. Unless you are working on some weird embedded system it is safe to typecast it into int (*)(const void*, const void*). Else define it as int compare(void * a, void * b) {return *(int*)a - *(int*)b;}. I normally set this to a warning in development code and use the function pointer typecast in release code. On x84 it will work fine, on some embedded architectures it's safer to define the function with dual void* and typecast the arguments inside it. – Sergey L. May 13 '13 at 9:28
    
Calling your second solution linear time is.. misleading. It's linear only in that the number requested is a fixed constant. If you want to go there, one could say that since the size of the row is also fixed, that the whole solution runs in constant time. It's more an O(N*M) which can be worse than your sort solution which is in nlogn time. – xaxxon May 13 '13 at 9:34
    
@xaxxon Yes, you are correct in that. At first I wanted to hard code the 3 into the function, but decided against it later. In the end of the day it turned out a more or less element-limited cheap insertion sort. – Sergey L. May 13 '13 at 9:36
    
the second time through your second solution j-loop with an input of 2, 1, it will shift the 2 over to position [1], insert the 1 at [0] and increment j to j=1 which is not less than numfound==1. it will then hit the numfound < howmany check and that will be true 1<3, so it will set result[1] = 1, overwriting the 2. <== I think. Perhaps put in a break in the j-loop after you hit your condition, then also check for j >= numfound in addition to numfound < howmany. Basically to tell you if you added anything in the j-loop or not. Or just use a flag. Or maybe just insert the first 3 before – xaxxon May 13 '13 at 9:46

Create a copy of one row in tmp_array (8 elements), then qsort(tmp_array), and finally use rand() % 3 as your answer element number.

share|improve this answer

Simple solution is you have three variables min1, min2, min3 to hold the three minimum variables.

share|improve this answer
    
the code to populate the variables, however, is less simple – xaxxon May 13 '13 at 9:21

take a array numbers[3] and save these three values in it.Now

int length = sizeof(numbers) / sizeof(int);
int randomNumber = numbers[rand() % length];
share|improve this answer
    
Finding the smallest 3 is much harder than picking the random one. He's having problems finding the 3, as his comment states. – xaxxon May 13 '13 at 9:22

Generally speaking , you can use heapsort to get the N minimum elements in a array such as the row you choose, you needn't sort all elements.But remember not saving the sorting result in the row itself. And use rand() to pick up one of them.

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void){
    int piezas[8][8] = {
        0, 2, 2, 5, 3, 2, 1, 1,
        0, 4, 5, 2, 4, 3, 0, 0,
        0, 4, 2, 2, 1, 2, 3, 2,
        0, 3, 1, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4,
        2, 5, 6, 5, 3, 1, 2, 7,
        8, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2, 1, 1,
        1, 2, 2, 1, 1, 6, 3, 4,
    };

    int myrow = 3; // the row I want to analyze
    int index;
    int min[3]={99,99,99};//or INT_MAX at <limits.h>
    for (index=0;index<8;index++) {
        printf("%d", piezas[myrow][index] );
        int i, temp = piezas[myrow][index];
        for(i=0;i<3;++i){
            if(temp<=min[i]){
                int wk = min[i];
                min[i]=temp;
                temp = wk;
            }
        }
        printf(" ");
    }
    printf("min:");
    for(index=0;index<3;++index)
        printf(" %d", min[index]);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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