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Suppose I've got the following data.table :

dt <- data.table(id=c(rep(1,5),rep(2,4)),
                 sex=c(rep("H",5),rep("F",4)), 
                 fruit=c("apple","tomato","apple","apple","orange","apple","apple","tomato","tomato"),
                 key="id")

   id sex  fruit
1:  1   H  apple
2:  1   H tomato
3:  1   H  apple
4:  1   H  apple
5:  1   H orange
6:  2   F  apple
7:  2   F  apple
8:  2   F tomato
9:  2   F tomato

Each row represents the fact that someone (identified by it's id and sex) ate a fruit. I want to count the number of times each fruit has been eaten by sex. I can do it with :

dt[,.N,by=c("fruit","sex")]

Which gives :

    fruit sex N
1:  apple   H 3
2: tomato   H 1
3: orange   H 1
4:  apple   F 2
5: tomato   F 2

The problem is, by doing it this way I'm losing the count of orange for sex==F, because this count is 0. Is there a way to do this aggregation without loosing O-count combinations ?

To be perfectly clear, the desired result would be the following :

   fruit sex N
1:  apple   H 3
2: tomato   H 1
3: orange   H 1
4:  apple   F 2
5: tomato   F 2
6: orange   F 0

Thanks a lot !

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Arun has obviously given you good options, but it looks like best practice in this situation (i.e. when you want to include empty categories in your summary output) is to bypass the by= argument, and instead just aggregate using a data.table passed in to the i= argument.

setkey(dt,sex,fruit)[CJ(unique(sex), unique(fruit)), .N]
#    sex  fruit N
# 1:   F  apple 2
# 2:   F orange 0
# 3:   F tomato 2
# 4:   H  apple 3
# 5:   H orange 1
# 6:   H tomato 1
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One way is to change sex or id to factor (id is redundant here?)

dt[, sex := factor(sex)]
dt[, list(sex=levels(sex), N=c(table(sex))), by="fruit"]
#     fruit sex N
# 1:  apple   F 2
# 2:  apple   H 3
# 3: tomato   F 2
# 4: tomato   H 1
# 5: orange   F 0
# 6: orange   H 1

Or you can change fruit to factor and group by sex:

dt[, fruit := factor(fruit)]
dt[, list(fruit = levels(fruit), N=c(table(fruit))),by=sex]
#    sex  fruit N
# 1:   H  apple 3
# 2:   H orange 1
# 3:   H tomato 1
# 4:   F  apple 2
# 5:   F orange 0
# 6:   F tomato 2

Edit:

But I suspect if your data.table is huge, then depending on table may not be a good idea. In this case, using CJ from your earlier question may be the way to go. That is, first do the aggregation and then do a join.

out <- setkey(dt, sex, fruit)[, .N, 
             by="sex,fruit"][CJ(c("H","F"), 
             c("apple","tomato","orange")), 
             allow.cartesian=TRUE][is.na(N), N := 0L]
#    sex  fruit N
# 1:   F  apple 2
# 2:   F orange 0
# 3:   F tomato 2
# 4:   H  apple 3
# 5:   H orange 1
# 6:   H tomato 1
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1  
I was testing your answer and thinking "it works great, but seems a bit slow". Then I saw your edit :) Brilliant, thanks a lot. –  juba May 13 '13 at 10:25
    
Last edit is amazing! –  stackoverflax Apr 18 at 18:01

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