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Take a look at this regular expression:

(?:\(?")(.+)(?:"\)?)

This regex would match e.g

"a"
("a")

but also "a)

How can I say that the starting character [ in this case " or ) ] is the same as the ending character? There must be a simplier solution than this, right?

"(.+)"|(?:\(")(.+)(?:"\))
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3 Answers 3

I don't think there's a good way to do this specifically with regex, so you are stuck doing something like this:

/(?:

"(.+)" 
|
\( (.+) \)

)/x
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how about:

(\(?)(")(.+)\2\1

explanation:

(?-imsx:(\(?)(")(.+)\2\1)

matches as follows:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?-imsx:                 group, but do not capture (case-sensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \1:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    \(?                      '(' (optional (matching the most amount
                             possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \2:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    "                        '"'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \2
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (                        group and capture to \3:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    .+                       any character except \n (1 or more times
                             (matching the most amount possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of \3
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \2                       what was matched by capture \2
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \1                       what was matched by capture \1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
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Yes, there are backreferences in PHP, but the TC don't want to match ("a"( so its not working in this example. –  dognose May 13 '13 at 10:50

You can use Placeholders in PHP. But note, that this is not normal Regex behaviour, its special to PHP.:

preg_match("/<([^>]+)>(.+)<\/\1>/") (the \1 references the outcome of the first match)

This will use the first match as condition for the closing match. This matches <a>something</a> but not <h2>something</a>

However in your case you would need to turn the "(" matched within the first group into a ")" - which wont work.

Update: replacing ( and ) to <BRACE> AND <END_BRACE>. Then you can match using /<([^>]+)>(.+)<END_\1>/. Do this for all Required elements you use: ()[]{}<> and whatevs.

(a) is as nice as [f] will become <BRACE>a<END_BRACE> is as nice as <BRACKET>f<END_BRACKET> and the regex will capture both, if you use preg_match_all

$returnValue = preg_match_all('/<([^>]+)>(.+)<END_\\1>/', '<BRACE>a<END_BRACE> is as nice as <BRACKET>f<END_BRACKET>', $matches);

leads to

array (
  0 => 
  array (
    0 => '<BRACE>a<END_BRACE>',
    1 => '<BRACKET>f<END_BRACKET>',
  ),
  1 => 
  array (
    0 => 'BRACE',
    1 => 'BRACKET',
  ),
  2 => 
  array (
    0 => 'a',
    1 => 'f',
  ),
)
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