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I have a test collection with 5 million records: for(var i = 0; i < 5000000; i++) { db.testcol.insert({field1: i}) }

Inserted an index: db.testcol.ensureIndex({field1:1})

Now the funny thing:

mongos> db.testcol2.find({field1: {$gte: 0}},{field1:1,_id:0}).explain();
{
        "cursor" : "BtreeCursor field1_1",
        "isMultiKey" : false,
        "n" : 5000000,
        "nscannedObjects" : 0,
        "nscanned" : 5000000,
        "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 0,
        "nscannedAllPlans" : 5000000,
        "scanAndOrder" : false,
        "indexOnly" : true,
        "nYields" : 4,
        "nChunkSkips" : 0,
        "millis" : 4675,
        "indexBounds" : {
                "field1" : [
                        [
                                0,
                                1.7976931348623157e+308
                        ]
                ]
        },
        "server" : "jvangaalen-PC:27020",
        "millis" : 4675
}

Indexonly is true, nscannedobject: 0 (meaning it never looked at the real document to examine it

Now the same query, but with _id:1 (_id is not in the index so it has to look at the document too):

> db.testcol2.find({field1: {$gte: 0}},{field1:1,_id:1}).explain(); {
>         "cursor" : "BtreeCursor field1_1",
>         "isMultiKey" : false,
>         "n" : 5000000,
>         "nscannedObjects" : 5000000,
>         "nscanned" : 5000000,
>         "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 5000000,
>         "nscannedAllPlans" : 5000000,
>         "scanAndOrder" : false,
>         "indexOnly" : false,
>         "nYields" : 5,
>         "nChunkSkips" : 0,
>         "millis" : 3742,
>         "indexBounds" : {
>                 "field1" : [
>                         [
>                                 0,
>                                 1.7976931348623157e+308
>                         ]
>                 ]
>         },
>         "server" : "jvangaalen-PC:27020",
>         "millis" : 3742 }

Response times dropped from 4.7 seconds to 3.7 seconds. Indexonly: false and nscannedobjects is 5000000 (all). This seems funny because it seems that it has to do more work for the same resultset, but still is significantly faster.

How is this possible? Reason why I am trying different this is that I cannot get nscannedobjects to 0 when it's running a indexonly:true query after sharding

share|improve this question
    
Did you run the queries more than one time? Maybe some cache created this weird effect. o_O –  vinipsmaker May 13 '13 at 21:06
    
Yes, always run the queries a couple of times after eachother to ensure it coming from ram. Always get very consistent results. Try it yourself, the case is very simple –  Joerek van Gaalen May 14 '13 at 21:07
    
I successfully replicated the result. You should ask in the MongoDB user's mailing list, where the chance of have someone with knowledge about the MongoDB internals is higher. –  vinipsmaker May 14 '13 at 22:55
    
Thanks, but what/where is that MongoDB users mailing list? After searching Stackoverflow seems to be the most used place to discuss these kind of things. The performance seems to differ with different versions. Version 2.2.4 seems to show 4080ms response times with both indexonly:true and false, doesn't matter. But 2.2.4 is 700ms faster (on my machine) compared to 2.4.3 for the same query –  Joerek van Gaalen May 17 '13 at 8:16
    
The MongoDB users mailing list: groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/mongodb-user And MongoDB's topic in StackOverflow isn't that active. I see a lot of questions-without-answers here (mainly because of poorly written questions, but still...). –  vinipsmaker May 17 '13 at 19:29

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