Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My case is pretty simple: I want my C++ program to deal with Unix signals. To do so, glibc provides a function in signal.h called sigaction, which expects to receive a function pointer as its second argument.

extern "C"
{
void uponSignal(int);
}

void uponSignal(int)
{
    // set some flag to quit the program
}

static
void installSignalHandler()
{
    // initialize the signal handler
    static struct sigaction sighandler;
    memset( &sighandler, 0, sizeof(struct sigaction) );
    sighandler.sa_handler = uponSignal;

    // install it
    sigaction( SIGINT, &sighandler, nullptr );
}

My question is: is the extern "C" linkage specifier necessary?

Bonus question: can uponSignal be declared static?

share|improve this question
    
Some compilers will simply refuse to compile it if you remove extern "C" because the second argument to sigaction has the wrong type. It is a bug in many compilers that they don't consider linkage part of the function type. –  Marc Glisse May 13 '13 at 13:21

2 Answers 2

My question is: is the extern "C" linkage specifier necessary?

For maximum portability, yes; the C++ standard only guarantees interoperability with C via functions declared extern "C".

Practically, no; most sensible ABIs (including the GNU ABI used by glibc) will use the same calling convention for C and C++ non-member (and static member) functions, so that extern "C" is only needed to share the function name between languages.

Bonus question: can uponSignal be declared static?

Yes. External linkage is only needed to access the function by name from other translation units; it's not necessary to call the function via a function pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Would you have a quote to back “The C++ standard only guarantees interoperability with C via function declared extern "C" ”? –  qdii May 13 '13 at 12:27
1  
@qdii: Not really; there's nothing that explicitly says there's no guarantee, just nothing that provides that guarantee. 7.5/1 specifies that "Two function types with different language linkages are distinct types even if they are otherwise identical", and has a note indicating that "a particular language linkage may be associated with [...] a particular calling convention, etc." –  Mike Seymour May 13 '13 at 12:43

extern C is only necessary if you export your symbols from your binary or import them from another binary (typically in both cases, a shared library), in order to avoid name mangling.

Here this is not the case, you're not linking uponSignal across various binaries so you don't need extern C. All you're doing is pass your function's address to sigaction from a function that already knows uponSignal's address since they are (apparently) part of the same translation unit, or at the very least of the same binary.

Bonus question: can uponSignal be declared static?

Sure if you want. uponSignal doesn't need external linkage anyway.

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, I was more worried about calling conventions than name mangling. –  qdii May 13 '13 at 11:52
2  
You shouldn't. ;) Even though calling conventions are implementation-specific (ie. outside the scope of the standard), I've never seen a compiler that didn't make the calling convention part of the function signature so that the compiler will warn you if there ever is a mismatch (which seldom happens anyway). –  syam May 13 '13 at 12:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.