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I am looking for a C++ library for Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) which can also return the NxN DWT matrix of the transform. There was a similar question opened here

Looking for a good C/C++ wavelet library for signal processing

but I am looking for something more specific as you can see.

It would be more helpful if the library is under some non-GNU license that lets me use it in proprietary software (LGPL, MPL, BSD etc.)

Thanks in advance

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The reason why this matrix is never computed is that it is very inefficient to compute the DWT using it. The FWT approach is much faster.

For a signal of length 16 and a 3-level haar transform, I found that this matrix in matlab

>> h=[1 1];
>> g=[1 -1];
>> m1=[[ones(1,8) zeros(1,8); ...
        zeros(1,8) ones(1,8); ... 
        1 1 1 1 -1 -1 -1 -1 zeros(1,8); ...
        zeros(1,8) 1 1 1 1 -1 -1 -1 -1]/sqrt(8); ...
        [1 1 -1 -1 zeros(1,12); ...
        zeros(1,4) 1 1 -1 -1 zeros(1,8); ...
        zeros(1,8) 1 1 -1 -1 zeros(1,4); ...
        zeros(1,12) 1 1 -1 -1]/sqrt(4); ...
        [g zeros(1,14); ...
        zeros(1,2) g zeros(1,12); ...
        zeros(1,4) g zeros(1,10); ...
        zeros(1,6) g zeros(1,8); ...
        zeros(1,8) g zeros(1,6); ...
        zeros(1,10) g zeros(1,4); ...
        zeros(1,12) g zeros(1,2); ...
        zeros(1,14) g]/sqrt(2)]    

m1 = 
A  A  A  A  A  A  A  A  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  A  A  A  A  A  A  A  A
A  A  A  A -A -A -A -A  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  A  A  A  A -A -A -A -A
B  B -B -B  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  B  B -B -B  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  B  B -B -B  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  B  B -B -B
C -C  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  C -C  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  C -C  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  C -C  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  C -C  0  0  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  C -C  0  0  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  C -C  0  0
0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0  C -C

where A=1/sqrt(8), B=1/sqrt(4) and C=1/sqrt(2).

That shows you how you build your matrix from the filters. You start with the bottom half of the matrix --a matrix of zeroes, putting filter g 2 steps further every row. then make the filter twice as wide and repeat, only now shift 4 steps at a time. repeat this until you are at the highest level of decomposition, the finally put the approximation filter in at the same width (here, 8).

just as a check

 >> signal=1:16; % ramp
 >> [h g]=daubcqf(2); % Haar coefficients from the Rice wavelet toolbox
 >> fwt(h,signal,3) % fwt code by Jeffrey Kantor
 >> m1*signal' % should produce the same vector    

Hope that helps you writing it in C++. It is not difficult (a bit of bookkeeping) but as said, noone uses it because efficient algorithms do not need it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. I understand why is inefficient, in fact I've already knew it. Unfortunately, the method I am working on (CS) requires such matrix. – user3100 May 17 '13 at 13:54

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