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Having trouble implementing the following:

+-------------------+
|                   |
|                   |
|     RESIZABLE     |
|                   |
|      NSVIEW       |
|                   |
|                   |
|                   |
|                   |
|                   |
|                   |
|                   |
|                   |
|                   |
|+-----------------+|
||                 ||
||     STATIC      ||
||                 ||
||     SUBVIEW     ||
||                 ||
|+-----------------+|
+-------------------+

Where the aspect ratio of the subview must stay constant (as the user changes the width of the resizeable view).

I'd like to do it using constraints, so far I've got:

//This is a snippet of the resizable view class

[self addConstraint:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:self attribute:NSLayoutAttributeWidth relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual toItem:subview attribute:NSLayoutAttributeWidth multiplier:1 constant:0]];
[self addConstraint:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:self attribute:NSLayoutAttributeBottom relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual toItem:subview attribute:NSLayoutAttributeBottom multiplier:1 constant:0]];

//This is a snippet of the subview class

[self addConstraint:[NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:self attribute:NSLayoutAttributeHeight relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual toItem:self attribute:NSLayoutAttributeWidth multiplier:aspectRatio constant:0]];

The frame of the resizable view is initially set. In this case it would make sense not to set the frame of the subview? At the moment, the main view just seems to disappear - it starts width a width of zero.

How should I go about this - I'd love to use constraints if possible!

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I would have thought that the first two constraints you show are back-to-front; don't you want the subview to be constrained by the parent (resizable) view? –  trojanfoe May 13 '13 at 11:54
    
@trojanfoe that's what I thought at first, but doing it that way spits out an error: "Unable to install constraint on view. Does the constraint reference something from outside the subtree of the view? That's illegal." –  Jordan May 13 '13 at 11:56
    
Well I'm no expert but I know you can express constraints WRT the superview, but you might need to use the visual language version of the method. –  trojanfoe May 13 '13 at 11:58
    
What exactly do you want to happen when the user resizes the view? Do you want the subview to maintain its spacing to the resizable view (so it would grow wider and taller to maintain its aspect ratio)? Are you setting up some of these constraints in IB, or all in code? –  rdelmar May 13 '13 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This can be done by setting up most of the constraints in IB, then changing one of them in code. The static subview should have whatever spacing constraints you want to the sides and bottom of the resizable view, and a fixed height constraint -- after making those, you should be able to delete the constraint to the top of the resizable view if there is one. Make an IBOutlet to the height constraint, and change that in code like this (heightCon is my outlet, and this code is in the static subview subclass):

- (void)awakeFromNib {
    [self removeConstraint:self.heightCon];
    self.heightCon = [NSLayoutConstraint constraintWithItem:self attribute:NSLayoutAttributeHeight relatedBy:NSLayoutRelationEqual toItem:self attribute:NSLayoutAttributeWidth multiplier:.54 constant:0];
    [self addConstraint:self.heightCon];
}

The .54 number came from my initial ratio of height to width in IB.

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Yes, except that should probably go in the view controller's -viewDidLoad instead of the app delegate. –  noa May 13 '13 at 16:06
    
@noa, there is no viewDidLoad in OS X. –  rdelmar May 13 '13 at 16:07
    
In the nib owner's -awakeFromNib on OS X. I usually set a flag to avoid running my setup code more than once, since in some cases that method is called more than once. For an NSWindowController you can also use -windowControllerDidLoadNib. –  noa May 13 '13 at 16:12
    
@noa, yeah, I just changed it to the awakeFromNib, that's probably a better place. –  rdelmar May 13 '13 at 16:12
    
@noa -awakeFromNib is never called more than once for a given instance of a class. So there is no need for any protective flag. Of course on iOS, a given view might be deleted by the system if it's not currently shown, and so a new instance will have to be created when you try to show that view again. But a new instance should require everything in -awakeFromNib running on it. If you have some code that only ever runs once for all instances, then -awakeFromNib is the wrong place for it. It should be a singleton, or a part of the appDelegate for example. –  Steve Waddicor May 13 '13 at 16:47

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