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I was writing a Point class (in 3d space) and have been wondering what would be the best way to create the origin point. Here is the basic class (taken from Andy's example, just in case someone wondered what the basic implementation was):

struct Point
{
    constexpr Point(double x_, double y_, double z_) : x(x_), y(y_), z(z_) { }

    double x;
    double y;
    double z;
};

The first way to have the origin would be to define a constexpr variable:

constexpr Point origin = { 0.0, 0.0, 0.0 };

The second would be to define a new type and overload algorithmsif they can benefit from optimizations when computing with the origin (let's assume I wrote a constexpr constructor for Point):

struct Origin: public Point
{
    constexpr Origin():
        Point(0.0, 0.0, 0.0)
    {}
};
constexpr Origin origin;

While the first method seems simpler and less error-prone, I would like to know whether the second one looks like a good idea and whether it has some pitfalls I did not see.

EDIT: Thinking of reference libraries, I noticed that CGAL used something like that:

class Origin {};
const Origin ORIGIN;
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

While the first method seems simpler and less error-prone, I would like to know whether the second one looks like a good idea and whether it has some pitfalls I did not see.

I think the inheritance-based design is conceptually flawed: you do not want to introduce a new type here, and the origin is conceptually an instance (a very special instance, but still an instance) of the Point class, not a specialization of that type.

I would rather add a static constexpr member function called origin() here:

struct Point
{
    constexpr Point(double x_, double y_, double z_) : x(x_), y(y_), z(z_) { }
    constexpr static Point origin() { return {0, 0, 0}; }

    double x;
    double y;
    double z;
};

You could then use that this way:

int main()
{
    constexpr Point o = Point::origin();
}

Alternatively, you could add a static data member of type Point called origin rather than having a static function called origin(). Which one to choose is mostly a matter of taste.

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What about overloading critical algorithms for Origin? Would there be any way to have this advantage again with your solution? I know it logically should be an instance, but we can still get advantages with it being a type. –  Jehan May 13 '13 at 12:03
    
What are these critical algorithms that you mention? –  rwols May 13 '13 at 12:03
    
@Jehan: Just use an if (...) to handle the case where the point being passed is the origin. –  Andy Prowl May 13 '13 at 12:05
    
@Jehan: Moreover, Point x(1, 2, 3); Point y(2, 4, 6); my_algorithm(2*x - y);. Here my_algorithm will work with the origin, and the only way to detect it is through an if (...). –  Andy Prowl May 13 '13 at 12:05
    
@AndyProwl Yes, I already knew it would not change anything with a computed origin. That would just be a tool for the user when he really means he wants to use the origin and somehow benefit from it. –  Jehan May 13 '13 at 12:08

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