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I need to implement some methods that do stuff with different kinds of number arrays. Usually, I'd use generics for that job, but as C doesn't provide them, I'm now trying to emulate them using macros.

Here's an example of what I'm trying to do:

#ifndef TYPE
#define TYPE int
#endif

TYPE get_minimum_##TYPE (TYPE * nums, int len){
    TYPE min = nums[0];

    for (int i = 1; i < len; i++) {
        if (nums[i] < min) {
            min = nums[i];
        }
    }

    return min;
}

However, this won't compile. The clang error message:

error: expected ';' after top level declarator

Is there any way to do this in C? Or do I need implement this for every type by hand?

share|improve this question
    
fyi generics in c# and java are a runtime facility. –  Daniel A. White May 13 '13 at 12:44
    
If you want to read a little bit more about "templates"/"generics" in C, you can read this question. There are some interesting answers :) –  Jehan May 13 '13 at 13:33
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can do something like this in a header file:

//
// generic.h
//

#define TOKENPASTE(x, y) x ## y

#define GET_MINIMUM(T) TOKENPASTE(get_minimum_, T)

TYPE GET_MINIMUM (TYPE) (TYPE * nums, int len){
    TYPE min = nums[0];

    for (int i = 1; i < len; i++) {
        if (nums[i] < min) {
            min = nums[i];
        }
    }

    return min;
}

and then #include it in a source file for each required type, e.g.:

//
// generic.c
//

#define TYPE int
#include "generic.h"
#undef TYPE

#define TYPE float
#include "generic.h"
#undef TYPE

You can test this by running it through the preprocessor:

$ gcc -E generic.c 

int get_minimum_int (int * nums, int len){
    int min = nums[0];

    for (int i = 1; i < len; i++) {
        if (nums[i] < min) {
            min = nums[i];
        }
    }

    return min;
}

float get_minimum_float (float * nums, int len){
    float min = nums[0];

    for (int i = 1; i < len; i++) {
        if (nums[i] < min) {
            min = nums[i];
        }
    }

    return min;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That did the job. Thanks! (I have another 6 minutes until I can accept it.) –  fb55 May 13 '13 at 12:51
    
There's more than one way of doing this, but if it's a small function then you can just make it inline and put everything in a header. –  Paul R May 13 '13 at 13:01
    
Actually, that doesn't work. The method is now called get_minimum_TYPE. –  fb55 May 13 '13 at 13:10
    
Token pasting requires a macro argument... –  Jonathan Leffler May 13 '13 at 14:01
    
OK - fixed now - I had to use a workaround to get token pasting to do the right thing in this context - sorry for the initial incorrect answer. –  Paul R May 13 '13 at 14:14
show 2 more comments

Actually, the best you can do is to define a macro that will generate the function for the given type.

#define define_get_minimum(T) \
T get_minimum_##T(T* nums, int len){ \
    T min = nums[0]; \
    for (int i = 1; i < len; i++) { \
        if (nums[i] < min) { \
            min = nums[i]; \
        } \
    } \
    return min; \
}

Then, you can call that macro to define the specializations you need (with C++ template, a similar thing is done automagically by the compiler).

define_get_minimum(int)
define_get_minimum(double)
define_get_minimum(float)

Another thing that a C++ compiler does automagically is deduce the overloaded function you need. You can't have that in C, so you will have to tell you are using the it specialization. You can simulate a template-like syntax for your function with the following macro (the C++ <> are just replaced by ()):

#define get_minimum(T) get_minimum_##T

Then, you should be able to call it the following way:

int main()
{
    // Define arr as char* array...
    // Do stuff...
    int res = get_minimum(int)(arr, 3);
}

I did not test this code, but it should work.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: I just tested it and it seems to work. –  Paul R May 13 '13 at 15:03
    
I like the style of the final call, but I was trying to archive this without large macros. –  fb55 May 14 '13 at 9:47
    
@fb55 Well, generic and not large are not that compatible in C :) –  Jehan May 14 '13 at 16:24
    
That's what I liked about @PaulR's answer: The macro was pretty short, and was reusable at other places :) –  fb55 May 14 '13 at 16:27
    
@fb55 The problem is that is depends on a compile-time parameter. With his version, you can not use the float and the int version of the function in the same compile unit :/ –  Jehan May 14 '13 at 16:29
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