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I've just started understanding C# code and wanted to try out a Console Application. Fairly basic, and would involve a loop to carry out some work until the user decides to quit. This is how my program looks for now.

public void Method1(string[] args)
{
    if (args.Length != 0)
    {
        DoWork(args);
        ResetValues();
        Loop(parameter);                
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("No arguments passed");
        string helpMsg ...
        Console.WriteLine(helpMsg);
    }

public void Loop(parameter)
{
    bool wantsContinue = true;

    while (wantsContinue)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("What would you like to do now?\n-Exit\tWrite 'e'\n-Run again\tWrite 'r'");
        ConsoleKeyInfo command = Console.ReadKey();
        char key = command.KeyChar;

        switch (key)
        {
            case 'e':
                return;
            case 'r':
                Console.WriteLine("Please enter your commands");                        
                string input = Console.ReadLine();
                Method1(parameters);
                break;
            case 'h':
                Console.WriteLine(helpMsg);
                break;
            default:
                Console.WriteLine("\nInvalid argument. Enter again");
                break;
        }
    }
}

public void MethodContinuous(input)
{
    Console.WriteLine(input);
    string[] args = input.Split(' ');

    if (args.Length != 0)
    {
        DoWork(args);
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine("No arguments passed");
        string helpMsg = ...
        Console.WriteLine(helpMsg);
    }
}

However, I am getting a problem which I can't figure out. When the program enters the loop first time, it sets the parameters correctly, but when the loop is continuing, it gives me the user input from the previous run. I'm probably doing something that isn't right, or the Console works a bit differently. Can the expert figure it out?

share|improve this question
    
So, what is ProgramLoop()? What is ResetValues()? –  bash.d May 13 '13 at 13:03
    
changed it. Basically I set up what I was gonna write beforehand, but thought I got a solution. Changed method names and forgot to update them. ProgramLoop was renamed to just loop. ResetValues just resets the values of my variables, and nothing else. As you can obviously tell, I'm quite a beginner! :( –  coder_007 May 13 '13 at 13:07
    
Allright, never mind... Still, what happens in these methods? And in DoWork(), too? What does your main look like? I believe you will eventually kill your stack... –  bash.d May 13 '13 at 13:08
    
DoWork basically takes the input from the user and concatenates it. I'm eventually going to turn this into a mathematical tool, but for now concatenating input from the user is what DoWork() does. This is a class seperated from Program class, the object is created by main and main just calls method1 to start off the program. –  coder_007 May 13 '13 at 13:13
    
Please post the code... –  bash.d May 13 '13 at 13:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Set a break after every case-Statement

switch (key)
    {
        case 'e':
            wantsContinue = false;
            break;
        case 'r':
            Console.WriteLine("\nYippeeee! I get to run again");
            Console.WriteLine("Please enter your commands");                        
            string input = Console.ReadLine();
            Method1(parameters);
            break;
        case 'h':
            Console.WriteLine(helpMsg);
            break;
        default:
            Console.WriteLine("\nInvalid argument. Enter again");
            break;
    }

From MSDN:

Execution of the statement list in the selected section begins with the first statement and proceeds through the statement list, typically until a jump statement is reached, such as a break, goto case, return, or throw. At that point, control is transferred outside the switch statement or to another case label.

share|improve this answer
    
hold on, i made a mistake. let me update it. –  coder_007 May 13 '13 at 12:57
    
updated it mate. i used a previous version. –  coder_007 May 13 '13 at 13:00
    
Also note that you must have a break or a return or throw an exception in each case, else you get a compile error. –  Matthew Watson May 13 '13 at 13:02
1  
You said, "If you don't put a break, the thread of execution will "fall" through the next case until a break or return occurs." That's not true at all. C# does not support "fall through." Without a break or other transfer-of-control, you'll get a compile error. –  Jim Mischel May 13 '13 at 13:13
    
@JimMischel Corrected it, thank you –  bash.d May 13 '13 at 13:16

Try this

case 'r':
            Console.WriteLine("Please enter your commands");                        
            parameters[0]= Console.ReadLine();
            Method1(parameters);
            break;
share|improve this answer

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