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I'd like to generate Java code which is based on existing Java code.

Here comes an example:

@A
class A {
  @A
  a;

  @A
  b;

  c;
}

@A
class B {
  a;

  @A
  b;

  c;
}

A.java, B.java -(code transformer)-> A.java, B.java

The transformed code should look like this:

class A {
  a;

  b;
}

class B {
  b;
}

As you can see, all the stuff (classes, fields, methods, ...) annotated with a custom annotation should be part of the resulting code. All the other stuff is dissmissed.

Note: The implementations of the particular methods should be part of the resulting code. All used types should be imported, ...

Any hints how to do it with this project: https://today.java.net/pub/a/today/2008/04/10/source-code-analysis-using-java-6-compiler-apis.html#accessing-the-abstract-syntax-tree-the-compiler-tree-api

?

Best regards

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None of the code posted will compile. Why would you want that? –  jlordo May 13 '13 at 13:45
1  
@jlordo I think this is more an example than actual code. Anyway, you should take a look at Cup and JFlex. –  DeadlyJesus May 13 '13 at 13:48
    
You can do it with an annotation processor at least. –  NilsH May 13 '13 at 13:48

3 Answers 3

The standard way to do something like this is to parse the program to some AST (using, for example, the API you mentioned), then modify the AST in any way you wish - e.g., filtering out aspects without some annotation - and finally, creating some visitor which can print the AST back to source code form. This way should work, though you lose source formatting. Also, creating the printing-back-source-code visitor is quite a chore.

Alternatively, you can use existing libraries for Java source transformation (which probably work in the same way as the above), for example Spoon. Specifically, here's a Spoon filter which only matches elements with a given annotation - exactly what you're looking for.

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Hi Oak, that's probably what I'm looking for (not sure yet). Thank you. Ok... I know how this works (the Java side). Unfortunately the bootstrap process is quite difficult. Is there any way to add spoon as maven dependendcy and bootstrap it from Java code? I'd like to wrapp all this transformation process in a custom library. –  kalamar May 13 '13 at 15:05
    
@kalamar I don't know; I never actually used it, I only know that it is intended for the kinds of operations that you're interested in. –  Oak May 13 '13 at 15:17
1  
Here is an interessting project: mir.cs.illinois.edu/~bdaniel3/spoonloader It's a simple facade for spoon (the bootstrap process) and an example (look into the sample package) how to use it. –  kalamar May 13 '13 at 16:17

Java 6.0 has an Annotation Processing API which can be invoked via the compiler. This API allows you to create customized Annotation Processors which can traverse the Java Mirror trees representing your annotated classes. Though it's complicated, this can be leveraged to process and generate new source files.

I've used this extensively for source-file generation (Java-to-Java and Java-to-Python), and have been very impressed with it.

Here are a few links which might help you get started:

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thank you. I've already considered this. In my opinion that's still to difficult to handle. Do you have any concrete examples? –  kalamar May 13 '13 at 15:19
    
Y'know, that's a great question, and was one of the most difficult parts of using the PAPAPI. Concrete and useful examples were somewhat hard to find. The links I posted have a few small examples (esp. the last one), though they can be a bit hard to apply to a specific scenario. I do think it's worth the effort to learn, however: once you master the Mirror API and the ability to navigate and traverse it prior to compilation, you can build some pretty powerful source-generation tools. –  bedwyr May 13 '13 at 15:30

you can simply write and compile a java application that reads the uncompiled class .java as text and choose needed code according to @ or any special characters in comments that does not affect the code, then re-write the transformed code to another file.java then compile it.

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1  
That's not that easy... take a look on Oaks anwser above. No offense, but it's not a question for Java noobies. Thanks anyway! –  kalamar May 13 '13 at 14:56
2  
Text processing is inadequate for handling sources of Java-like languages. I don't see a viable way to do so without (at least) lexing and parsing - or in other words, building an AST - which is indeed what the OP is looking into. –  Oak May 13 '13 at 15:21

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