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I want to know if this tutorial is correctly implementing factory design pattern in PHP. Below is the actual source code.

<?php
class Automobile
{
    private $vehicle_make;
    private $vehicle_model;

    public function __construct($make, $model)
    {
        $this->vehicle_make = $make;
        $this->vehicle_model = $model;
    }

    public function get_make_and_model()
    {
        return $this->vehicle_make . ' ' . $this->vehicle_model;
    }
}

class AutomobileFactory
{
    public static function create($make, $model)
    {
        return new Automobile($make, $model);
    }
}

// have the factory create the Automobile object
$veyron = AutomobileFactory::create('Bugatti', 'Veyron');

print_r($veyron->get_make_and_model()); // outputs "Bugatti Veyron"

According to a book "Design Patterns" by Gang of Four, applicability of factory pattern is

  • a class can't anticipate the class of objects it must create
  • a class wants its subclasses to specify the objects it creates
  • classes delegate responsibility to one of several helper subclasses, and you want to localize the knowledge of which helper subclass is the delegate

First point, this example actually knows what class of objects to create, which is Automobile, doesn't it?

Second point, there is no subclass. Automobile class does not inherit from AutomobileFactory. I thought AutomobileFactory should have at least one function implemented by Automobile, which deals with object creations.

Can someone clarify this? I just started learning design patterns, and every time I encounter tutorials different from others, it confuses me a lot.

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4 Answers 4

I pretty much agree with what is said in Wikipedia

  • The creation of an object precludes its reuse without significant duplication of code.
  • The creation of an object requires access to information or resources that should not be contained within the composing class.
  • The lifetime management of the generated objects must be centralized to ensure a consistent behavior within the application.

The main reason I create factories is this one I highlighted.

For example, let's imagine a real world factory with many plants throughout the country. This factory produces doors. Doors needs knobs. For logistics reasons, each one of the plants of the factory has its own knob suppliers, another completely different factory.

The production manager software of this factory will choose based on some criteria which plant will produce a lot of doors, but it does not need to know from where the knobs will come. The chosen plant will ask for its own supplier for a knob for the produced door.

However, for the client, it does not matter which plant made the door, he only cares about having his door.

Let's put this on code:

class Knob {
    // something...
}

interface KnobSupplier {
    public function makeKnob();
}

class SaoPauloKnobSupplier {
    public function makeKnob() {
        return new Knob('Knob made in São Paulo');
    }
}

class NewYorkKnobSupplier {
    public function makeKnob() {
        return new Knob('Knob made in New York');
    }
}

class Door {
    public function __construct(Knob $knob) {
        // something...
    }
}

interface DoorFactory {
    public function makeDoor();
}

class SaoPauloDoorFactory {
    private $knobSupplier;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->knobSupplier = new SaoPauloKnobSupplier();
    }

    public function makeDoor() {
        return new Door($this->knobSupplier->makeKnob(), "Door made in São Paulo");
    }
}

class NewYorkDoorFactory {
    private $knobSupplier;

    public function __construct() {
        $this->knobSupplier = new NewYorkKnobSupplier();
    }

    public function makeDoor() {
        return new Door($this->knobSupplier->makeKnob(), "Door made in New York");
    }
}

class ProductionManager {
    private $plants = array();
    // methods for adding plants, etc...
    public function getDoor() {
        // Somehow decides which plant will create the door.
        return $plant->makeDoor();
    }
}

class Client {
    public function getMyDoor(ProductionManager $manager) {
        return $manager->getDoor();
    }
}

Using this code like:

$manager = new ProductManager();
$manager->addPlant(new SaoPauloDoorFactory());
$manager->addPlant(new NewYorkDoorFactory());

$client  = new Client();

var_dump($client->getMyDoor($manager));

ProductManager does not know anything about knobs, Client does not know anything about the factory having more than one plant.

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1  
Now imagine the factory does not do only doors, but also windows, that require glass. Each plant will have its own glass supplier, but again, neither client or the manager need to know this. –  Henrique Barcelos May 16 '13 at 13:03
    
Thanks a lot for your detailed answer. I understand the clear separation of concerns in your code and I am with you. However, I am little confused. Which class uses strictly traditional Factory method pattern? DoorFactory class seems to be using factory pattern because it is deferring a creation of Door object to its subclasses(SaoPauloDoorFactory and NYDoorFactory). But I don't see any relationship between DoorFactory and KnobSupplier in terms of design patterns. –  kidonchu May 16 '13 at 20:19
    
There is no relationship between them. Imagine there is another plant that also makes knobs beside doors. It would not need a supplier. In this example, all factories return the same type of door. To see the strictly tradicional factory method, you should see just a pair Factory/Product. In this case, all factories creates the same type of object, but it doesn't need to be like this. –  Henrique Barcelos May 16 '13 at 20:24

I don't really like the tutorial. As you can see in the WikiPedia page about factories ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_pattern ) - it's normally done differently. The WikiPedia example does comply with the rules you mention. Check out the PHP section there.

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That's pretty much the same example:) –  onetrickpony May 13 '13 at 14:33
    
I disagree - except for the fact that they both produce cars. Let's look at your list and then at the Wiki example. 1. a class can't anticipate the class of objects it must create - true for the CarFactory - doesn't know what It'll be producing. 2. a class wants its subclasses to specify the objects it creates - true, check out the SedanFactory –  spike May 13 '13 at 14:37
    
But it knows, it's Sedan. There's another example below (encapsulation), which indeed is different –  onetrickpony May 13 '13 at 14:40
    
But CarFactory doesn't - doesn't the list apply to this class? –  spike May 13 '13 at 14:47
    
It's not really a class, it's an interface. Sure you could say it applies, but the classes that implement it still break the rule the OP mentioned. Personally, I don't think those rules are valid anyway. A factory should simply create objects, that's it –  onetrickpony May 13 '13 at 14:49

I'm with you kidonchu, I don't really see that example as a traditional factory method pattern.

I would write your example like this (psuedo code)

<?php

abstract class CarAbstract
{
    protected $_vehicleMake;
    protected $_vehicleModel;

    public function __construct($model)
    {
        $this->_vehicleModel = $model;
    }

    public function getMakeAndModel()
    {
        return $this->_vehicleMake . ' ' . $this->_vehicleModel;
    }
}

class Bugatti extends CarAbstract
{
    public function __construct($model)
    {
        parent::__construct($model);

        $this->_vehicleMake = get_class($this);
    }
}

class AutomobileFactory
{
    public static function getInstance($make, $model)
    {
        if (is_file('Model/Car/' . $make . '.php')){
            require_once 'Model/Car/' . $make . '.php';
            $car = new $make($model);
        }else{
            throw new Exception('Car not found');
        }
    }
}

$veyron = AutomobileFactory::getInstance('Bugatti', 'Veyron');

print_r($veyron->getMakeAndModel()); // outputs "Bugatti Veyron"
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Thanks for your modification to codes. Strictly speaking, this modification is still not a "Factory method", is it? From what I understand, there are at least three types of factory method--Abstract Factory method, Factory method, and Simple Factory method. And modified code looks more like Simple Factory method because CarAbstract class does not deal with creation of any object at all. Please correct me if I'm wrong. –  kidonchu May 16 '13 at 20:04

There's actually a single Factory Method design pattern following the original gang of four catalog. The Abstract Factory is wholly different and is based on different structural assumptions. The Simple Factory is not a design pattern, but the what Freemans call a 'programming idiom.' The Factory method includes an abstract Creator and Product, and the Clients generally make their requests through the Creator. Specific factories are found in the ConcreteCreator(s) and the concrete products are child classes of the Product class and are instantiated by concrete creators. For a complete and simple PHP example see http://www.php5dp.com/a-simple-php-design-pattern-the-factory-method/.

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