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I want to have a model with calculated fields that I can apply sorting on. For example, let's say that I have the following model:

class Foo(models.Model):
    A = models.IntegerField(..)
    B = models.IntegerField(..)
    C = models.ForeignKey(..)

I want to have a D and an E field that are calculated by the following formulas:

  1. D = A - B
  2. E = A - X (where X is a field of the relevant record of model C)

Implementing this would be trivial if I didn't need to apply sorting; I would just add properties to the model class. However, I need ordering by these fields.

A solution is to fetch all records into memory and do the sorting there, which I conceive a last resort (it will break things regarding pagination).

Is there a way to achieve what I'm trying? Any guidance is appreciated.

EDIT: Denormalization is a no-go. The value of field X changes very frequently and a lot of Foo records are related to one record of model C. An update of X will require thousands of updates of E.

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Just to point out that a similar question has been asked: stackoverflow.com/questions/930865/… –  celopes Oct 31 '09 at 3:52
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4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I would take a look at the extra method on Queryset and specify the order_by parameter.

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Unless D and E are materialized in the database, I don't see how the extra(order_by) is going to help. –  celopes Oct 31 '09 at 3:44
    
@celopes sql's order by works with on-the-fly calculated fields, therefore extra method is suitable here. –  shanyu Oct 31 '09 at 19:35
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If you would not mind some logic duplicaton, then the following will work:

Foo.objects.extra(select={'d_field': 'A - B'}).extra(order_by=['d_field'])
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I haven't presently got a Django install running, but I think what you're asking is how to do a custom save, such that D and E are automatically generated. I don't know what your ForeignKey's return on unicode is, so I'm assuming it's not a string and assigning "valueName" as token vlaue for the integer you want to usage.

Anyway, it should go a bit like this:

class Foo(models.Model):
    A = models.IntegerField(..)
    B = models.IntegerField(..)
    C = models.ForeignKey(..)
    D = models.IntegerField(..)
    E = models.IntegerField(..)
    def save(self):
        self.D = self.A - self.B
        self.E = self.A - self.C.valueName
        super(Foo, self).save()

Anything prior to the last line of that (super()) will be PRE save, anything after is POST. That's really the most important point there.

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This is OK if shanyu doesn't mind materializing the computed fields in the database. –  celopes Oct 31 '09 at 3:43
    
Please see my edit, denormalization is not an option. Thanks for the help. –  shanyu Oct 31 '09 at 19:36
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I find that without the *args and **kwargs in the save method, it returns an error. And as celopes stated, this is only a solution if you don't mind materializing the computed field in the database.

class Foo(models.Model):
    A = models.IntegerField(..)
    B = models.IntegerField(..)
    C = models.ForeignKey(..)
    D = models.IntegerField(..)
    E = models.IntegerField(..)

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.D = self.A - self.B
        self.E = self.A - self.C.X
        super(Foo, self).save(*args, **kwargs)

    class Meta:
        ordering = ["E", "D"]
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