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Given the following code, how would I be able to lock the richtextbox so that each log-call gets to finish working before another can start typing to it?

private delegate void ReportLogDelegate(RichTextBox box, Color color, string message);

public void FileLog(string file, string project, string type, string fileNr, string note)
{
    if (type == "incoming")
    {
        this.Invoke(new ReportLogDelegate(this.AppendText), new object[] { logTextBox, Color.Orange, String.Format("{0} - {1}", DateTime.Now.ToShortDateString(), DateTime.Now.ToShortTimeString()) });
        string message = string.Format("\n\tFile Incoming\n\tFile: {0}\n\tProject: {1}\n\tFileNumber: {2}\n\n", file, project, fileNr);
        this.Invoke(new ReportLogDelegate(this.AppendText), new object[] { logTextBox, Color.White, message });
    }
    else if (type == "done")
    {
        this.Invoke(new ReportLogDelegate(this.AppendText), new object[] { logTextBox, Color.GreenYellow, String.Format("{0} - {1}", DateTime.Now.ToShortDateString(), DateTime.Now.ToShortTimeString()) });
        string message = string.Format("\n\tFile Received\n\tFile: {0}\n\tProject: {1}\n\tFileNumber: {2}\n\n", file, project, fileNr);
        this.Invoke(new ReportLogDelegate(this.AppendText), new object[] { logTextBox, Color.White, message });
    }
    else if (type == "error")
    {
        this.Invoke(new ReportLogDelegate(this.AppendText), new object[] { logTextBox, Color.Red, String.Format("{0} - {1}", DateTime.Now.ToShortDateString(), DateTime.Now.ToShortTimeString()) });
        string message = string.Format("\n\tError Receiving File\n\tFile: {0}\n\tProject: {1}\n\tFileNumber: {2}\n\tError: {3}\n\n", file, project, fileNr, note);
        this.Invoke(new ReportLogDelegate(this.AppendText), new object[] { logTextBox, Color.Red, message });
    }
}


// Append text of the given color.
void AppendText(RichTextBox box, Color color, string text)
{
    int start = box.TextLength;
    box.AppendText(text);
    int end = box.TextLength;

    // Textbox may transform chars, so (end-start) != text.Length
    box.Select(start, end - start);
    {
        box.SelectionColor = color;
        // could set box.SelectionBackColor, box.SelectionFont too.
    }
    box.SelectionLength = 0; // clear
}

Each call to FileLog should be allowed to run to the end before another has access to the RTB.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just put the whole body of the method into a lock block. Create a new private object to lock on so that you can be sure no other methods are using that same sync lock:

private object key = new object();
public void FileLog(string file, string project, string type, string fileNr, string note)
{
    lock(key)
    {
        //your existing implementation goes here
    }
}

This is assuming that you don't have any other methods that would also be accessing that rich text box. If you do have others then you'll need to ensure that the object that you lock on is accessible to all of them.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why not lock on the RichTextBox? – Kevin May 13 '13 at 16:10
3  
@Kevin Because you can't know who else might possibly end up locking on it, when, how, or what the results might be. It could result in a deadlock if you're not careful about it, which is why it's generally best to create objects that specifically exist for locking on. – Servy May 13 '13 at 16:16
1  
@Cyborgx37 Remember that the RTB, being a UI control, can only be accessed from the UI thread. The only reason this code can't rely on that to solve all of the problems is that there are multiple writes to it, and they need to be treated as atomic. Technically if another section of code accesses the RTB but only ever does one write per transaction it doesn't need a lock. – Servy May 13 '13 at 16:18
1  
@Cyborgx37 Correct, I didn't think long enough about that. I suppose the other solution would just be to refactor the code to be one call to Invoke, then no locking is needed. – Servy May 13 '13 at 16:27
1  
@CeeRo No, it doesn't need to be static, because no static resources are accessed. It is only ever accessing instance variables (the RTB) so if there was another form with it's own RTB there would be no need to synchronize access between the two. – Servy May 13 '13 at 16:33

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