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As part of a larger program, I need to solve a quite simple ODE in Fortran. To avoid having to implement the solver myself (and surely introduce a couple of bugs before I get it right) I thought I'd use a library, if there is one - but I can't find anything that works.

I've looked at ODEPACK and found someone who re-packaged it, but the original distribution is distributed as really hairy source code, and the re-pack doesn't build on my laptop - it emits a bunch of warnings about converting INTEGER(8) and REAL(8) to INTEGER(4) and REAL(4) before stopping on

gfortran -shared -o libodepack.so opkda1.o opkda2.o opkdmain.o
/usr/bin/ld: opkda1.o: relocation R_X86_64_32 against `dls001_' can not be used when making a shared object; recompile with -fPIC
opkda1.o: could not read symbols: Bad value
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status
make: *** [odepack.so] Error 1

so I assume it's a 32/64-bit incompatibility issue (I have a 64-bit processor). Adding the -fPIC flag as the error message suggested didn't help - I got the same message anyway.

Is ODEPACK, or something similar, available for modern Ubuntu distributions in a more easily installable form?

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first thing id do is get the original code and compile some of the demo programs. The package looks to be still actively supported computation.llnl.gov/casc/odepack/odepack_home.html btw. I wouldn't bother them with problems likely related to the third party distro though. – agentp May 14 '13 at 12:18

A simple way to get ODEPACK working in a fortran code is to compile it with the source code, rather than trying to make .a files etc. Using these three files you can download from Netlib: opkdmain.f opkda1.f opkda2.f you can just compile them in gfortran using -c command then link the .o files created together.

You will get warning messages from the gfortran compiler saying "Deleted feature:..." (you won't get these messages with ifort). This is because ODEPACK is written in fortran 77 and uses things like GO TO statements. Fortran90 still recognises these statements but recommends that you don't use them. However, the code should still run when you execute it using the gfortran or ifort compiler.

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Why do you need a package for this? For simple ODE you can code your own simple RK function in just 10 min. Doing so you are avoiding the unnecessary dependence in your program and learning some very useful algorithms. If you don't like this idea, just take some code from anywhere else if your program license allows it. F.e. take a look at the collection of Mr. John Burkardt. You should know it if you are writing fortran code, but anyway I give here two links. http://people.sc.fsu.edu/~jburkardt/f_src/rk4/rk4.html http://people.sc.fsu.edu/~jburkardt/f_src/rkf45/rkf45.html

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I actually did end up writing my own RK4, which works just fine - the reason I wanted a library function was partly to learn what libraries are available, and how to use them. – Tomas Lycken May 17 '13 at 19:10
    
ODE solvers are implemented almost in every serious math lib, f.e. NAG or INTEL MKL, or if you need open source, take a look at GSL+FGSL, it has also some. – zmi May 20 '13 at 22:22

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