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We have a requirement to only use stored procedure to update/insert data in a SQL table.

I can create the stored procedure which will update the 150 columns, but that will require that I need to take all the 150 columns values from the object I have and explicitly pass all 150 columns to the stored procedure.

Can anyone please suggest a way in which I don't have to pass all 150 values explicitly ?

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2  
What do you mean by explicitly? –  Abe Miessler May 13 '13 at 17:18
1  
Do you mean you want to pass the object to the stored procedure? 'cause that would be cool, but impossible. –  AFischbein May 13 '13 at 17:25
1  
@Abe Miessler : I believe what he means is that you would need to add new SqlParameter("@param", value) for each of the 150 params. (If he is using ADO.NET) –  cvraman May 13 '13 at 17:26
2  
@TanujGulati: Create the procedure the standard way. Call it the standard way. Yes, there are 150 parameters but when it comes time to add that 151st parameter it will be SO much easier than having to deal with the other options. Also the code will be more understandable and clearer than any of the other options presented as answers below. –  NotMe May 13 '13 at 17:44
3  
You could use Entity Framework - giving you nice to use .NET objects - and let EF call the stored procedures and do all the mapping of all values to all stored procedure parameters ... –  marc_s May 13 '13 at 17:54

8 Answers 8

The other answers here have shown alternative ways to accomplish your goal. However, I would caution you against their use for several reasons.

  1. Most are all brittle. Meaning that you have potential problems that will not show up compile time and, in many cases, won't show up unless every single edge case is properly tested.

  2. Most result in the same or more code. You aren't saving any code by having to parse a string or turning an xml file into a temp table prior to updating/inserting into your main table.

  3. The non-standard ways means that the next programmer on this project is going to need to pay attention to the fact that this procedure operates differently than the others for no other reason than to save a few lines of C# code.

Point is, just go ahead and create your stored procedure the usual way and call it the usual way. Most issues will show up in compile time or with limited test cases. Further by keeping the same format as your other code you are increasing the likelihood that future changes will be successful without a lot of extra work.

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I don't agree exactly. The xml (passed in) could be pre-validated as best as possible. I typically use strong datasets to store my client side xml, thus I get "type checking" on the client side. And I do a DataSet.GetXml() (on the instantiated strong dataset) and pass that down to the stored procedure. –  granadaCoder May 13 '13 at 17:54
2  
@granadaCoder: Which may be fine for a single app hitting a single database. I'm not sure what other requirements exist for the OP; however if there is another application then you have now forced the other team to start using XML. Further you've put additional pressure on the DB server by forcing the creation of a temp table every time an order is modified. For some systems this might be ok; for high performance ones it's not. –  NotMe May 13 '13 at 18:02
1  
+1 because you advise against the "hacky" solutions like XML and string parsing. –  Matthew May 13 '13 at 18:13
1  
@granadaCoder: Yes, a single batched transaction will generally outperform multiple single transactions. However we are talking about an orders table here. The most likely use case is that individuals are placing a single order at a time. So, adding the extra layer of supporting updating multiple orders in one pass is most likely unnecessary. Meaning if I have 100 people placing an order at once, these are 100 separate and unrelated transactions. Using your method that means 100 separate temp tables, which takes up memory and time on the sql server to establish. –  NotMe May 13 '13 at 18:17
1  
I agree if all the other code in the project is "code up parameters" and the OP is always inserting just one row, that he/she...just go ahead and "code up" all the parameters and be done with it (and keep the consistency). Any funky array stuff is for the birds. But if there is any "set based" needs, then the xml solution might be considered. Probably a better question is where are there so many parameters....I hope none of them are "flags for IF checks in the TSQL"..So Upvote on this one for me. But whenever I know I might have some setbased needs, I go to xml, thus it isn't abnormal 4 me –  granadaCoder May 13 '13 at 22:12

You pass xml.

If you supply a value for a row/column, you update it. If no value is supplied you, use the original value. This can be done via a CASE statement.

Here is a Northwind example.

EDIT: I coded a #temp table here. You could experiment with a @variable table. I've done both at times. It "just depends". You could go straight from the xml to the real table (no intermediate #temp or @variable table), some of the original MS examples did this. You want want to try MERGE (if you have 2008 and up) or wrap the INSERT/UPDATE statements in a TRAN. (What I typically do is shred the xml first, then begin the TRAN, Insert/Update (or MERGE), then COMMIT.

Use Northwind
GO


IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#OrdersHolder') IS NOT NULL
begin
        drop table #OrdersHolder
end


CREATE TABLE #OrdersHolder
(
IdentityKey int not null identity (1001, 1), 
[OrderID] int, 
[ShippedDate] datetime,
[Freight] money
)


-- Declare XML variable

DECLARE @data XML;

-- Element-centered XML

SET @data = N'
<root>
    <Order>
        <OrderID>10248</OrderID>
        <ShippedDate>01/01/2001</ShippedDate>
        <Freight>33.33</Freight>
    </Order>

    <Order>
        <OrderID>10249</OrderID>
        <ShippedDate>02/02/2002</ShippedDate>
        <Freight>44.44</Freight>
    </Order>

    <Order>
        <OrderID>10250</OrderID>
        <Freight>55.55</Freight>
    </Order>

    <Order>
        <OrderID>10251</OrderID>
        <ShippedDate>09/09/2999</ShippedDate>
    </Order>

    <Order>
        <OrderID>-99999</OrderID>
        <ShippedDate>12/31/2222</ShippedDate>
        <Freight>333.00</Freight>
    </Order>

</root>

';



INSERT INTO #OrdersHolder ( [OrderID] ,  [ShippedDate] , [Freight] )
SELECT T.myEntity.value('(OrderID)[1]', 'INT') AS OrderID,
       T.myEntity.value('(ShippedDate)[1]', 'datetime') AS ShippedDate, 
       T.myEntity.value('(Freight)[1]', 'money') AS Freight
FROM @data.nodes('root/Order') AS T(myEntity)


;

select * from #OrdersHolder

/* Here is the magic */

Update dbo.[Orders] 
Set 
[ShippedDate] = CASE
                    WHEN holder.[ShippedDate] IS NOT NULL then holder.ShippedDate
                    ELSE realTable.ShippedDate
                END
,
[Freight] = CASE
                    WHEN holder.[Freight] IS NOT NULL then holder.Freight
                    ELSE realTable.Freight
                END
FROM    
    #OrdersHolder holder , dbo.[Orders] realTable
Where
    holder.OrderID = realTable.OrderID


/* Note, the OrderID will be incorrect because OrderID is IDENTITY , so I used -99999 to force a non match */
INSERT INTO dbo.[Orders] ( [ShippedDate] , [Freight] )
Select
[ShippedDate] = CASE
                    WHEN holder.[ShippedDate] IS NOT NULL then holder.ShippedDate
                    ELSE null
                END
,
[Freight] = CASE
                    WHEN holder.[Freight] IS NOT NULL then holder.Freight
                    ELSE null
                END
FROM    
    #OrdersHolder holder
Where
not exists ( select null from dbo.Orders innerRealTable where holder.OrderID = innerRealTable.OrderID )





/* Now show the real table data, 2 rows should have both [ShippedDate] and  [Freight] updated, 1 row just Freight and one row just the ShippedDate */

Select 
UpdateStatusFYI = 
CASE
    when realTable.OrderID = 10248 then 'Should be ShippedDate and Freight'
    when realTable.OrderID = 10249 then 'Should be ShippedDate and Freight'
    when realTable.OrderID = 10250 then 'Should be just Freight'
    when realTable.OrderID = 10251 then 'Should be ShippedDate'
    else 'unknown'
END
,
realTable.[OrderID], realTable.[ShippedDate] , realTable.[Freight]  from    #OrdersHolder holder join dbo.[Orders] realTable
    on holder.OrderID = realTable.OrderID 

/* Take a best shot at showing newly created data */
Select 
realTable.[OrderID], realTable.[ShippedDate] , realTable.[Freight]  from #OrdersHolder holder join dbo.[Orders] realTable
    on holder.ShippedDate = realTable.ShippedDate and holder.Freight = realTable.Freight 
Where
not exists ( select null from dbo.Orders innerRealTable where holder.OrderID = innerRealTable.OrderID )





IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#OrdersHolder') IS NOT NULL
begin
        drop table #OrdersHolder
end
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure this results in less work... Actually, now that I look at it a second time I'm pretty sure it results in a lot more work. –  NotMe May 13 '13 at 17:41
    
INSERT will work the same way. But will have to allow nulls on all optional columns. –  granadaCoder May 13 '13 at 17:42
    
I feel the xml solution is more maintainable down the road. And very easy to follow. So a little more work up front (or the same amount of work?) and you have a good/maintainable solution. When a new column comes along, the signature of the stored procedure doesn't change. You just make a few changes inside the stored procedure to accommodate the new column. –  granadaCoder May 13 '13 at 17:50
2  
Although an interesting use of XML, this fails to solve the OPs issue if the purpose is simply to avoid writing 150 lines of new SqlParameter(...) Also, with regards to maintainability, what you propose now results in a single "special" procedure that doesn't follow conventions laid out by the others. It also means that a schema must be in sync between the two parts and that any developer needing to make changes needs to understand some of the issues with SQL processing of XML data. Of which there are plenty. –  NotMe May 13 '13 at 17:57
1  
Yes, he passes 1 parameter. Which must then be parsed out into the actual columns in a temp table and then thrown into a merge/insert/or update statement... The parsing alone exceeds the code written to do the parameters the normal way. –  NotMe May 13 '13 at 18:03

Not sure if this is what you intend, but one thing you can do is pass all the values in one parameter to the stored proc (via VARCHAR(MAX) or TEXT type), concatenated with a character, say '|' (pipe) then split it up in the stored procedure to update each column. This approach has a number of drawbacks (limited size of VARCHAR and proper order of params, for starters), but without further details, it may be a good start.

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+1 .. like this idea .. but in case of 150 columns there would be case where the varchar is not able to hold the full data.. but in general this will be very good method to go around.. –  pratik garg May 13 '13 at 17:26
1  
I don't like the delimited string solutions. Nothing personal. –  granadaCoder May 13 '13 at 17:35
3  
All you're really doing it trading the "complexity" of having 150 parameters for the complexity of having to parse strings in SQL. –  D Stanley May 13 '13 at 17:42
1  
As you pointed out, the single biggest drawback is that the order of the parameters must be identical otherwise everything falls down. Also, the parts where you have to split the passed in data up will result in much more code on the stored procedure side. To the point that you haven't saved any coding time in getting this going while you have certainly made it more brittle and more difficult for the average maintenance person to understand. –  NotMe May 13 '13 at 17:43
2  
SQL Server is not a string parser. When you can use a set-based solution, you probably should. –  Matthew May 13 '13 at 18:12

A lot depends on the requirements of the underlying tables, if none of the columns are Nullable the you could create and SP like this:

    CREATE PROCEDURE usp_SomeUpdateProc (@PrimaryKeyID INT,
     @Column1 VARCHAR = NULL,
     @Column2 INT = NULL,
     ...)
    AS 
    UPDATE dbo.SomeTable
    SET Column1 = ISNULL(@Column1, Column1),
        Column2 = ISNULL(@Column2, Column2),
        ....
    WHERE PrimaryKeyID = @PrimaryKeyId

With this type of Stored Procedure only the @PrimaryKeyId parameter is required and you just need to supply values for the parameters of the columns that are changing.

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Pass a table value as the parameter and use the MERGE syntax. This results in a strongly typed, set-based solution.

SQL 2008 gave us TVPs. In this way you can format the parameter just as the table you're updating. Then, using MERGE you simply set all the columns in your table to the corresponding columns in your TVP.

The TVP is strongly typed from the application and there doesn't need to be any string parsing or dynamic SQL.

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You could have a look at Dapper.

It is a 'micro-ORM' - which can handle a lot of the boilerplate code of copying from an objects property to a DbCommands parameters for you, without the added bloat of some of the bigger ORMs.

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Thanks for the response , I am using Entity framework 4 so i used Mapped the Stored proc. with Entity framework, which then created the Method like `public virtual ObjectResult> UpdateCaseFormID(Nullable id, string formId, Nullable usersId, string formDataSource, ....) {

        ObjectParameter idParameter;

        if (id.HasValue)
        {
            idParameter = new ObjectParameter("Id", id);
        }`

and i used the Object to pass all the values explicitly to the above method

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In such case I would rather use array (or composite variable) for passing the value. but you need to take precaution that this array type should hold the value for all 150 column datatype. means you should have array of master datatype among these 150 column datatype.

well . you can use array or varchar2 for this case..

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Again I got downvote even without getting any reaction from the person who voted me!! well don't know why this approach is not looking good even for some person????? Please you should provide reason before giving vote to any post –  pratik garg May 13 '13 at 18:15
1  
Because your answer is garbage, that's why. (and it wasn't me but just a guess) –  banging May 13 '13 at 18:30
    
but what is the problem with array? means you can give this type of parameters in array variables also.. I had done for some of my little testing stubs .. well where I didn't know the exact amount of the parameters .. but for this type of situation also we could use this.. just for idea.. –  pratik garg May 13 '13 at 19:36
    
What I wanted to say that you can provide the indexed array and you can easily use those to extract the value.. and if the index is not present in array .. well you can give the default value in exception handling part... –  pratik garg May 13 '13 at 19:40

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