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Given a string like this: Fixing this [HFW] takes alot of [HFW] time [HFW]

should be this: [CW] [CW] [HFW] [CW] [CW] [CW] [HFW] [CW] [HFW]

I need to replace any word with [CW] except the tags [HFW]. I've been trying this alot, the best i got is:

regex = new Regex(@"[^(\[HFW\])_]+");
cleanText = regex.Replace(cleanText, " [CW] ");

Which almost works, but i get the first capital F left out, being a part of [HFW] tag. I mean, it won't take [HFW] as a group.

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Why regex? Isn't this easier to do by tokenizing the string? – jsobo May 13 '13 at 17:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've got one which is a bit... cranky? But it does the trick for your sample string:

(?<!\[|F|\[F)\w+(?!W|\]|W\]\])

The issue with [^...] is that it doesn't look at the order of the characters \[, H, F, W or \].

There's probably a more elegant one than this and I'm still trying to look for it.

Another possible one:

\w+(?=\s)|(?<=\s)\w+
share|improve this answer
    
That's not working, it's replacing every character with [CW] except [HFW]. I need to replace every whole word. – user569605 May 13 '13 at 17:33
    
@user569605 It's replacing every whole word, I already tested it here. Your current pattern replaces series of words by a single [CW]. Is that what you actually want? – Jerry May 13 '13 at 17:35
    
Yes, it works, sorry :) Thank you! – user569605 May 13 '13 at 17:42
1  
I found another expression: \w+(?=\s)|(?<=\s)\w+. Maybe that one is better at your code? I'm still confused that C# is taking every character :( – Jerry May 13 '13 at 17:46
    
It was my mistake, it takes the whole word. Thank you alot :) – user569605 May 13 '13 at 17:52

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