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I'm a new user on stack overflow, however I've been coming for a while because it's a good resource. However, I've run into a problem that I can't seem to find the answer to.

Essentially, I'm trying to code the game Simon in HTML/JS and it's all working, except for the part where the game flashes the sequence so you know what the new sequence is. Essentially what I have is:

for(var i in thePattern){
    var obj = document.getElementById(thePattern[i]);
    window.setTimeout(colorON(obj),500);
    window.setTimeout(colorOFF(obj),1000);
}

where colorON and colorOFF are:

function colorON(obj){
    if(obj.id == "red"){
        obj.style.backgroundColor="#ff5555";
    }else if(obj.id == "blue"){
    obj.style.backgroundColor="#5555ff";
    }else if(obj.id == "green"){
    obj.style.backgroundColor="#88ff88";
    }else{
    obj.style.backgroundColor="#ffffaa";
    }
}
function colorOFF(obj){
    if(obj.id == "red"){
        obj.style.backgroundColor="#ff0000";
    }else if(obj.id == "blue"){
        obj.style.backgroundColor="#0000ff";
    }else if(obj.id == "green"){
        obj.style.backgroundColor="#22ff22";
    }else{
        obj.style.backgroundColor="#ffff00";
    }
}

What it seems to be doing is going through the entire for loop and starting all the timers and then then all the timers go off so quickly that the colors don't even seem to flash.

Any ideas? All help is greatly appreciated.


Thank you for all of your help guys, however, now it is flashing correctly and the closure is working correctly, however, it is flashing all the colors at the same time. I've tried putting the closure within another setTimeout, however, that just creates other problems.


SOLVED thanks for your help guys.

share|improve this question
    
You really need to learn about switch statements. –  epascarello May 13 '13 at 17:34
    
First fix the problems pointed out in the answers here. Then when you find the next issue that fixing this will expose, have a look at this: stackoverflow.com/questions/750486/… –  James Montagne May 13 '13 at 17:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need to pass a function to setTimeout:

window.setTimeout(function() {
    colorON(obj);
},500);

Right now, you're calling colorON(obj) immediately and passing its output to setTimeout, which makes it appear like setTimeout is firing immediately.

obj is also passed by reference, so by the time all of your functions will run, obj will refer to the last element in your loop. To get around that, you have to pass obj by value by shadowing it:

(function(obj) {
    window.setTimeout(function() {
        colorON(obj);
    }, 500);

    window.setTimeout(function() {
        colorOFF(obj);
    }, 1000);
})(obj);
share|improve this answer
    
You'll hit the "creating a function in a loop" problem. OP should keep the same code, and have the functions return a function. –  squint May 13 '13 at 17:33
1  
This is true, but fixing it will cause another issue. Calling setTimeout in a loop, the obj value will always be the final value of the last iteration. –  James Montagne May 13 '13 at 17:34
1  
@squint: I'd rather just shadow obj. Having colorON return a function is counter-intuitive. –  Blender May 13 '13 at 17:39
    
There's nothing intuitive about IIFE's... evidenced by all the people that ask about them... but ultimately the only "intuintive" solution is for JS to have block scope... again, evidenced by the fact that so many people expect it. –  squint May 13 '13 at 17:43
    
@squint: That's what the let keyword is for. Sadly, nobody supports it. –  Blender May 13 '13 at 18:14

You are calling the function, not assigning a reference to it! So the code runs right away and sets the setTimeout with whatever the function returns.

change

window.setTimeout(colorON(obj),500);
window.setTimeout(colorOFF(obj),1000);

to

for(var i in thePattern){
    var obj = document.getElementById(thePattern[i]);
    (function(obj) {
        window.setTimeout(function(){colorON(obj);},500);
        window.setTimeout(function(){colorOFF(obj);},1000);
    })(obj);
}

and code showing you how to do with with a switch or an object to get rid of the if/else logic

function colorON(obj) {
    var color = "";
    switch (obj.id) {
        case "red":
            color = "#ff5555"
            break;
        case "blue":
            color = "#5555ff"
            break;
        case "green":
            color = "#88ff88"
            break;
        default:
            color = "#ffffaa"
    }
    obj.style.background = color;
}

var colorsOff = {
    "red": "#ff0000",
        "blue": "#0000ff",
        "green": "#22ff22",
        "default": "#ffff00"
}



    function colorOFF(obj) {
        var color = colorsOff[obj.id] || colors["default"];
        obj.style.backgroundColor = color;
    }


var thePattern = {
    "one": "red",
        "two": "blue",
        "three": "green"
}


for (var i in thePattern) {
    var obj = document.getElementById(thePattern[i]);
    (function (obj) {
        window.setTimeout(function () {
            colorON(obj);
        }, 500);
        window.setTimeout(function () {
            colorOFF(obj);
        }, 1000);
    })(obj);
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/brjgc/

share|improve this answer
    
You'll hit the "creating a function in a loop" problem. OP should keep the same code, and have the functions return a function. –  squint May 13 '13 at 17:34

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