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To avoid keep having to use -> and instead work directly with the object, is it acceptable practice to do:

obj x = *(new obj(...));
...
delete &obj;
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4 Answers 4

up vote 23 down vote accepted

This is not just poor practice, but:

  1. Leaking memory (most likely, unless you are using some pattern that is not visible from the code you provided), since obj will store a copy of the original object created by the new expression, and the pointer to that object returned by new is lost;
  2. Most importantly, undefined behavior, since you are passing to delete a pointer to an object that was not allocated with new. Per paragraph 5.3.5/2 of the C++11 Standard:

[...] In the first alternative (delete object), the value of the operand of delete may be a null pointer value, a pointer to a non-array object created by a previous new-expression, or a pointer to a subobject (1.8) representing a base class of such an object (Clause 10). If not, the behavior is undefined.

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1  
And the second trumps the first. He won't leak memory, because the program probably won't run long enough for him to do more than one allocation. –  James Kanze May 13 '13 at 17:35
    
@JamesKanze: Yes, indeed –  Andy Prowl May 13 '13 at 17:36
1  
Well, one can do obj &x = *new at the very least. –  Adrian Panasiuk May 14 '13 at 13:51

No, and in fact this leads to a leak. x is copy initialized, so the original object pointed to by new obj is lost.

Just use

obj x(...);

No need for dynamic allocation. Or

obj x = obj(...);

if you must (doubt it).

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2  
Or you could use a reference obj& = (*new ... –  Marcin May 13 '13 at 17:35
    
@Marcin You could, but why? –  James Kanze May 13 '13 at 17:35
3  
@Marcin yes, you could. You could also smash your keyboard to your screen. Just because you can, doesn't mean you should. :) –  Luchian Grigore May 13 '13 at 17:36
    
@JamesKanze Because OP wants to avoid dereferencing all the time, which is what references are for. –  Marcin May 13 '13 at 17:59
    
@Marcin You don't have to dereference if you follow Luchian's suggestion. –  James Kanze May 14 '13 at 7:38

Certainly not; that copies the dynamic object to an automatic variable, loses the only pointer to it, and then attempts to delete the automatic copy. You've got a memory leak and an invalid deletion.

Much better would be to use an automatic variable in the first place:

obj x(...);
...
// no need to delete anything

or, if it really must be dynamic for some reason (because it's too big for the stack, or you don't always want to destroy it here), then use a smart pointer, and a reference if you really don't like ->

std::unique_ptr<obj> p(new obj(...));
obj & x = *p;
...
// still no need to delete anything

Changing your x into a reference would be valid (as long as you're careful that exceptions, early function returns, etc. won't cause a leak), but would cause howls of confusion among anyone unfortunate enough to have to maintain it.

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You cannot delete your object properly if you do it like that.

Implicitly you do the following.

class A
{
public:
  int test (void) { return 1; }
};

int main (void)
{
  A * p = new A;
  A v(*p);
  //...
  delete &v; // &v != p and v is not constructed via new!
  return 0;
}

If you want to work with an object-like-syntax you can bind a reference to the object.

class A
{
public:
  int test (void) { return 1; }
};

int main (void)
{
   A * p = new A;
   A & r = *p;
   int i = r.test();
   delete p;
   return 0;
}

If you delete your object through the same pointer, there will be no leak.

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