Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a set of objects I'd like to do some operations on, in the order they're iterated. After that operation gets called on them, I'd like to perform other operations on them. Basically, the code will look sort of like this:

for(int i = 0;i < myobj.size();i++)
{
   myobj.at(i).doSomething();
}

for(int i = 0;i < myobj.size();i++)
{
   myobj.at(i).doSomethingElse();
}

This looks kind of ugly to me. How could I rewrite this into something better? The order of the operations should stay the same.

share|improve this question
1  
As a point of clarification: I'm assuming that you need need to perform doSomething() on all of the myobj items before calling doSomethingElse() on any of these items, correct? –  Reed Olsen Oct 30 '09 at 23:39
2  
What's the type of myobj? Is it an Iterable? –  Jack Leow Oct 30 '09 at 23:41
add comment

10 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

I don't know what myobj is but if it's Iterable, then you could use a foreach loop:

for (Foo foo : myobj) {
  foo.doSomething();
}

for (Foo foo : myobj) {
  foo.doSomethingElse();
}

If it's not Iterable, then making it so might help other code too.

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for the "if it's Iterable" –  Pascal Thivent Oct 30 '09 at 23:57
    
+1 for the same. –  alphazero Oct 31 '09 at 1:09
    
+1 for the most readable solution. Btw, the higher up abstraction will probably doo FooCollection coll = ...; coll.doSomethingAndSomethingElse() to encapsulate both loops. –  mhaller Nov 9 '09 at 21:37
add comment

If you absolutely must have both operations in different loops, refactor the loops out into appropriately named methods so that it's easier to understand at a glance:

createData();
saveData();
share|improve this answer
add comment

Use a foreach loop:

for (MyObject currentObject : myobj) {
  currentObject.doSomething();
}

for (MyObject currentObject : myobj) {
  currentObject.doSomethingElse();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

This looks like an excellent opportunity for you to apply the Visitor pattern.

share|improve this answer
add comment

http://www.iam.unibe.ch/~akuhn/blog/2008/pimp-my-foreach-loop/

share|improve this answer
    
Whoa... that's nice but.. I don't get it :( ... I will take a look at it with a fresher mind. :) –  OscarRyz Oct 31 '09 at 2:40
    
If you pull in Hamcrest you may be able to use these as well: code.google.com/p/hamcrest-collections/wiki/GettingStarted –  cwash Oct 31 '09 at 16:22
add comment

By using lambdaj you can obtain the same result without writing any explicit loop as it follows:

forEach(myobj).doSomething();
forEach(myobj).doSomethingElse();
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could always do something equally as ugly like

bool d=false;
for(int i = 0;i < myobj.size();i++)
{
   if(d==false){
     myobj.at(i).doSomething();
   }else{
     myobj.at(i).doSomethingElse();
   }
   if(i==myobj.size()-1 && d==false){ d=true; i=0;}
}
share|improve this answer
4  
I wouldn't call this "equally" ugly. –  Jorn Oct 30 '09 at 23:49
6  
That's not equally as ugly - it's far worse. –  adrianbanks Oct 30 '09 at 23:50
    
Well I was going to put in a goto, but Java doesn't have that does it? rofl –  Earlz Oct 31 '09 at 14:52
add comment

Slightly different from other offerings: have your calls to the methods return the next item to operate on, with a well defined terminate return (e.g., null):

while ((holder = holder.doSomething())!=null);
while ((holder = holder.doSomethingElse())!=null);

With some initial and intervening re-assignment of holder, obviously. Thumbs up on the Visitor suggestion, implementing Iterable is also a nice option; my solution could also be viewed as implementing Iterator with myObj:

while (myObj.hasNext()) myObj.next().doSomething();
myObj.resetIterator();
while (myObj.hasNext()) myObj.next().doSomethingElse();

One downside is if you ever get to the point that doSomething() and doSomethingElse() can be applied in a single loop, instead of two separate ones, you have to have a merged method to make this work and take advantage of that change.

An alternative on the for-loop, using a post-fix (actually inspired by that awful, obfuscating solution):

int size = myObj.size(), i=0;
while (i<size) myObj.at(i++).doSomething();
i=0;
while (i<size) myObj.at(i++).doSomethingElse();

and, if only the order of doSomething() on all and doSomethingElse() on all matters (i.e., not which index order they are visited in), you could even skip the reassignment there in the middle, and just pre-fix decrement for the second call.

int size = myObj.size(), i=0;
while (i<size) myObj.at(i++).doSomething();
while (i>0) myObj.at(--i).doSomethingElse();

which of course allows for an even sexier version of the Iterator solution above if myObj implements ListIterator instead of Iterator (okay, I'll stop editing more stuff in now...seriously).

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is an alternative way of writing the same.

I think, it is the Visitor pattern, although all the times I have seen it I don't quite get it ( the Visitor documentation ) so, probably this is something else.

Anyway, the idea is to use anonymous inner classes ( fake Java "closures" ) and write the iteration once.

public class IterationSample {
    public static void main( String [] args ) {

        Foo [] items = new Foo[0]; // get it from somewhere  ....

        iterate( items , new _(){void with( Foo f ){
            f.doSomething();
        }});    

        iterate( items , new _(){void with( Foo f ){
            f.doSomethingElse();
        }});    

        iterate( items , new _(){void with( Foo f ){
            f.doBar();
        }});   



    }
    // write  the loop once.
    static void iterate( Foo [] items, _ visitor ) {
        for( Foo f : items ) {
            visitor.with( f );
        }
    }
}

The Foo object would be the object would be your object.

// Not really abstract just for the sake of the sample. Use your own.
abstract class Foo {
    abstract void doSomething();
    abstract void doSomethingElse();
    abstract void doBar();

}

Finally this is the "visitor"

// made abstract instead of interface just to avoid having to type 
// "public" each time. 
abstract class  _ {
    abstract void with( Foo f );
}

It is a shame I can't avoid the return type of the method.

Otherwise this

         iterate( items ,new _(){ with( Foo f ){

Would read as:

Iterate items "noise" with foo

Why would you do that when you can do this?

Because that way you can have an array of operations:

 _ [] operations = {
        new _(){void with( Foo f ){
            f.doSomething();
        }},
        new _(){void with( Foo f ){
            f.doSomethingElse();
        }},
        new _(){void with( Foo f ){
            f.doBar();
        }}
 };

And iterate them :)

  for( _ andPerformAction : operations ) {
      iterate( items , andPerformAction );
  }

There might be some situations for this, although I can think of any right now =-S

share|improve this answer
add comment

ummm, would this work for you?

for(int i = 0;i < myobj.size();i++)
{   
    myobj.at(i).doSomething();
    myobj.at(i).doSomethingElse();
}
share|improve this answer
    
He said the order of the operations has to be the same. –  Jack Leow Oct 30 '09 at 23:39
1  
This changes the order -- A1B2C3 instead of ABC123. –  a paid nerd Oct 30 '09 at 23:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.