Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've seen multiple tutorials in python, played around a bit with python file write(), tell(), seek() functions and also os.write(), lseek() functions.

But I still don't get how can I do the following: What I have: In a file I know the start_offset and end_offset bytes. And I need to replace the bytes from start_offset to end_offset with a different set of bytes. How do I do this??

ftell() returns me the start_offset and similarly regex + ftell() returns me the end offset I have the bytes that will overwrite the original ones in the file.

But write() only takes a string to write. Also how do I overwrite from start_pos to end_pos??

appreciate any pointers/suggestions

share|improve this question
    
I CANNOT USE MMAP HERE BECAUSE THE FILE IS TOO BIG AND MMAP BAILS OUT WITH OUT OF MEMORY ERROR !! I HAVE TO RESORT TO FILE OPERATIONS : ( –  user999755 May 13 '13 at 17:58
6  
There is no need to shout; can you turn off your capslock next time? –  Martijn Pieters May 13 '13 at 17:59
    
Assuming the overwrite has the same size as end_pos - start_pos, simply fseek and then write –  grep May 13 '13 at 18:06
    
Just to clarify -- the replacement bytes are exactly the same size as the first set of bytes or different? If it is a different size, you need to replace the entire file from start_offset through the end of the file. –  dawg May 13 '13 at 19:18
    
sorry...will turn off shoutout next time –  user999755 Jun 6 '13 at 17:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Despite your shouted denial, you can use mmap here.

If you look at the mmap constructor in the docs, it takes parameters for offset and length. On most platforms, both have to be a multiple of the PAGESIZE or similar value, but that's not too hard.

So:

try:
    PAGESIZE = mmap.PAGESIZE
except NameError:
    PAGESIZE = mmap.ALLOCATION_GRANULARITY

def overwrite(fileobj, start, end, newbytes):
    startoffset, startremainder = divmod(start, PAGESIZE)
    offset = startoffset * PAGESIZE
    endoffset, endremainder = divmod(end, PAGESIZE)
    length = (endoffset + 1) * PAGESIZE - offset
    map = mmap.mmap(fileobj.fileno(), offset=offset, length=length,
                    access=mmap.ACCESS_WRITE)
    map[startremainder:startremainder+end-start] = newbytes

This has the nice advantage that if len(newbytes) != end - start you'll get a nice exception from mmap, instead of overwriting more or less of the file than you intended and leaving things corrupted.

But it's probably simpler to use seek, as in Martijn Pieters's answer. Here's the same function with seek:

def overwrite(fileobj, start, end, newbytes):
    if len(newbytes) != end - start:
        raise ValueError('overwrite cannot expand or contract a file')
    fileobj.seek(start)
    fileobj.write(newbytes)    

Still, it's worth knowing what mmap can do so you don't dismiss it in useful cases in the future.

(Also, with some versions of Python, on some platforms, you can have files that are too big to seek in. For example, a linux /proc/*/map is a sparse file with a size of 1<<64, but on some distros, Python can't find fseeko and therefore can't seek any farther than 1<<63. So, knowing the alternative ways to do this—os.lseek, mmap, etc.—may help you work around a problem one day.)

share|improve this answer

You write the exact number of characters == bytes, after .seek()-ing back to your start_offset position. These then overwrite the data that was there before.

You can split that up into multiple writes, even writes of one character (byte) at a time if needed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.