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I'm making a signup process that ends with a final script where the majority of the heavy lifting is done, after a user has made payment. These processes include:

  • Updating our sales DB several times
  • Making an external API post
  • Downloading, amending and uploading a file via SFTP
  • Sending confirmation emails

Essentially there's a lot of things to potenatially fail individually, all of which are critical and rely on the previous one working. I don't just want the final method to do all this to be along the lines of

try {
    $Signup->doEverything();
}
catch( Exception $e ) {
    echo "Something went wrong"
}

because that is no use to anybody.

I've ended up with a massive nested list of all these final processes that is now 11 deep - it does work, if one of the processes fails it dies with the correct exception, but seeing this many nests I just assume there should be a better way of handling all these processes.. Is this bad practice? Are there better solutions for dealing with large amounts of critical processes like this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should sub-class the exception class

i.e.

class ExceptionOne extends Exception
{

...

}

Then you can just have one try/catch block

i.e.

try
{

   ... i.e. throw an appropriate exception according to the problem

}
catch (ExceptionOne ex)
{
   ...
}
catch (ExceptionTwo ex)
{
   ...

}

etc.

catch (Exception ex)
{
   ... For a catch all
}
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That's a very good point. I'm sort of doing that anyway but didn't think about just doing it as one try with multiple catches. I've not worked in this way before... Thanks. –  artparks May 13 '13 at 18:34

Is it important for the user that all the steps are done before he continues? If not, you could opt to create jobs for the separate steps, which you run via a job queue like beanstalkd. The idea is that you leave a worker running all the time listening to beanstalkd. Then when you need it do something you post a message to beanstalkd indicating what needs to be done, like 'upload all files needed for account xyz via sfpt'. Then when a job is done, schedule the next one. Or, if the job fails due to an exception, delay the job; tell beanstalk go take the job back and start it again later. For example if there was a network error, wait a minute and then try again. Another advantage is that by offloading this kind of work the user experience will be better because they don't have to wait for the whole process to be done; it's all done in the background.

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Probably not worth doing that as it strikes me the main benefit of that is if there will be lots of these processes running simultaneously but that won't be too much of an issue here. Although I could think of a better way to retry any processes that fail before the whole thing gives up... –  artparks May 13 '13 at 18:37

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