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I'm looking to make a page that has a background gradient that changes color every few seconds and blends between transitions. Now I want to apply this effect on the to the upper elements that are blocked by a element that has a solid background.

To give you a better example what I mean I have attached a simple mockup and hopefully your understand what I'm attempting to do, I'm open to suggestions.

Jquery and CSS

The problem is obviously the block that contains the black background which any PNG transparent used would see black not the gradient.

I'll include sample code so far:

<body><!-- A Jquery script will be used to add CSS background, Easy stuff -->
<div class="blackbox">
    <div class="logo"><img src="#" alt=""></div>
    <hr class="h-line">
    <div class="v-line"> </div>
</div>

So what I'm after is either:

  • A known jQuery method to obtain a background image but it needs to be able to refer of the position of the gradient so its inline with the background.
  • A better solution to getting this to work, please bare in mind that the page needs to be responsive so I could use other methods but since its responsive I can't think of any.
share|improve this question
1  
Does this offer any insight: trentwalton.com/2011/05/19/mask-image-text or this: tympanus.net/codrops/2011/12/12/…? –  sellmeadog May 15 '13 at 22:07

7 Answers 7

Since you ask for alternatives to jQuery solutions

You could play a little with margins and box-shadow and keyframe animations.

Something in this direction for the shape (depends on what you want to do with which part - add content ... and in what way you want it to be responsive):

html:

<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="header"><img src="http://i.imgur.com/CUbOIxr.png" alt="Company name" /></div>
    <div class="content"></div>
</div>

CSS:

body {
    background:orange;
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
}
.wrapper {
    width:40%;
    height:90%;
    border:30px solid #000;
    border-right-width:100px;
    border-bottom-width:100px;
}
.header {
    width:100%;
    border-bottom:10px solid transparent;
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0 30px 0 #000;
    -moz-box-shadow: 0 30px 0 #000;
    box-shadow: 0 30px 0 #000;
}
.header img {
    width:100%;
}
.content {
    width:95%;
    height:400px;
    background-color:#000;
    margin-top:30px;
}

DEMO

This way no javascript is needed. And for the background you can use a linear gradient and do all animations with css transitions or keyframe animations. You also need to play with the lengths and adjust the borders and box-shadows to your needs, maybe add some @media queries for the responsiveness.

Hope this helps you a little in the right direction =)


Update:

I hoped the gradients changing was the smaller problem ;-) Silly me, sorry.

I will elaborate my CSS-only suggestion for the animation, but you can choose a javascript slider for the background animation, if you don't like CSS3 solutions - although this is the hot stuff now ;-)

Ok. So, I would add some more fixed positioned elements with gradient backgrounds (layer1 and layer2).

To have something in this direction in the html now:

<div class="layer layer1"></div>
<div class="layer layer2"></div>
<div class="wrapper">
    <div class="header">
        <img src="http://newtpond.com/test/company-name.png" alt="Company name" />
    </div>
    <div class="content"></div>
</div>

and add a keyframe animation on them in CSS (here it is just with the -webkit vendor prefix [probably cause I am a lazy bum], but I hope you can get the idea, and could add the others):

body {
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}
/* for the animation */
 .layer {
    position:fixed;
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
}
@-webkit-keyframes GoLayer1 {
    0% {
        opacity:1;
    }
    50% {
        opacity:0;
    }
    100% {
        opacity:1;
    }
}
@-webkit-keyframes GoLayer2 {
    0% {
        opacity:0;
    }
    50% {
        opacity:1;
    }
    100% {
        opacity:0;
    }
}
.layer1 {
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(43, 70, 94) 29%, rgb(194, 41, 41) 65%, rgb(155, 171, 38) 83%);
    -webkit-animation: GoLayer1 5s infinite;
}
.layer2 {
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(225, 202, 230) 29%, rgb(39, 163, 194) 65%, rgb(36, 124, 171) 83%);
    -webkit-animation: GoLayer2 5s infinite;
}
/* the wrapper shape */
 .wrapper {
    z-index:999;
    opacity:1;
    position:relative;
    width:40%;
    height:90%;
    border:30px solid #000;
    border-right-width:100px;
    border-bottom-width:100px;
}
.header {
    width:100%;
    border-bottom:10px solid transparent;
    -webkit-box-shadow: 0 30px 0 #000;
    -moz-box-shadow: 0 30px 0 #000;
    box-shadow: 0 30px 0 #000;
}
.header img {
    width:100%;
}
.content {
    width:95%;
    height:400px;
    background-color:#000;
    margin-top:28px;
}

DEMO (tested in Chrome 26 - looked cool =)

This is now where I can point you according this CSS-only approach. There is still stuff to modify and consider browser compatibility. But it is certainly an alternative ... and a step in the direction where html5 and css3 is going (if you want to be hot and cool ;-), hehe, sorry, too much silliness.

Good luck!


Update 2:

So, I overcame my laziness a tiny bit and added some more vendor prefixes to the top example (and of course you can use any image as background):

DEMO

And here I add another example, that is using a png image for the gradient, and is sliding up and down in the background (as another alternative):

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Its kinda whats been discussed, I'm after a solution that will allow a gradient that will change from one set of colors to another, the logo, the nav lines need to change color as per the JPG used in the background. but of course its gonna be surrounded in Black. I think the only way to do this would be to use javascript. –  bybe May 15 '13 at 23:02
    
I updated the answer with a keyframe animation on background divs with gradients, so you can kinda imagine where I was going before =) I only made it for -webkit-, but if you want I can add all the other vendor prefixes. Hope this is now more what you were looking for. Good luck with the webpage! ^_^ –  Martin Turjak May 16 '13 at 0:04
    
And of course you can use background images on the layer1 and layer2 and so on, or just use images instead of divs. –  Martin Turjak May 16 '13 at 0:11
    
Demo 2 is way Cool! –  bybe May 22 '13 at 10:32
    
@bybe Thanks! Glad you like it ^_^ ... And if you combine the opacity animation from the first demo with the background image from the second demo, you get what you wanted ... background images (that you prepare in photoshop =) fading in/blending into each other. –  Martin Turjak May 22 '13 at 15:15

There are many ways to do this, CSS3 and images are already suggested, so I'll suggest using a canvas.

The HTML canvas element has everything you need built in. It allows for gradient background fills, and with globalCompositeOperation, masking of shapes and text is possible, creating cut-outs in the background to make real changeable HTML elements truly transparent against a colored background. It also scales well, and can easily be made responsive.

The canvas element is supported in all major browsers except Internet Explorer 8 and below, which means browser support is better than many of the CSS3 methods previously mentioned, like keyframes and background-size.

Using a fallback, like say images that fade in and out if canvas is'nt available, should'nt be very hard to figure out, and in all other browsers except Internet Explorer below version 9, no images would be needed to create the gradient backgrounds and text masks in a canvas, which should make the loading of the page significantly faster.

To detect wether or not canvas is supported, you can use this convenient function :

function isCanvasSupported(){
  var elem = document.createElement('canvas');
  return !!(elem.getContext && elem.getContext('2d'));
}

used like so :

if ( isCanvasSupported() ) {
    // do canvas stuff
}else{
    // fall back to images
}

So, lets get to it! To create a "last resort" fallback and some elements we can "clone" into the canvas, we'll create the elements we need in the HTML to get a structure somewhat similar to what you've outlined in your question. This has the added advantage of being able to just change some of the CSS to also make changes in the canvas :

<div id="gradient">
    <div class="text">COMPANY NAME</div>
    <div class="h_bar"></div>
    <div class="v_bar"></div>
</div>

It's just a container with an element for text, and one for each of the bars.

Some styling is neccessary as well, I'll do it the easy way, with position absolute and some really fast positioning, as these elements won't be visible unless someone has disabled javascript anyway :

#gradient {position: absolute; 
           background: #000; 
           top: 5%; left: 5%; right: 5%; bottom: 5%;
          }
.text {position: absolute; 
      top: 20px; 
      left: 100px; 
      width: 400px; 
      color: #fff; font-size: 40px; font-weight: bold;
      font-family: arial, verdana, sans-serif;
      }
.h_bar {position: absolute; 
        height: 20px; 
        top: 100px; left: 60px; right: 60px; 
        background: #fff;
       }
.v_bar {position: absolute; 
        width: 20px; 
        top: 140px; bottom: 30px; right: 60px; 
        background: #fff;
       }

Without any javascript that would look exactly like THIS FIDDLE, and it should be somewhat responsive and adapt to the window size.

Now we need some javascript to turn those elements into something in a canvas. We'll create two canvas elements, one for the background, as I've decided to animate the background continously between random gradients, and one for the inner black box and the content (the text and the bars).

As the masking of the text and bars can be a little slow, we don't have to redraw everything, just the background canvas, as the foreground is pretty static. This also avoids a flickering issue in some browsers with high frame rates, and we're going to use requestAnimationFrame for the animation of the background canvas, so flickering in the text mask would be an issue if we did'nt use two canvas elements.

For browsers that does'nt support requestAnimationFrame we'll add this polyfill to make sure it works everywhere.

Time to write some javascript, this of course uses jQuery :

var gradSite = {
    init: function() {
        var self = this;
        self.create().setSizes().events();
        (function animationloop(){
            requestAnimationFrame(animationloop);
            self.draw().colors.generate();
        })();
    },
    create: function() { // creates the canvas elements
        this.canvas     = document.createElement('canvas');
        this.canvas2    = document.createElement('canvas');
        this.canvas.id  = 'canvas1';
        this.canvas2.id = 'canvas2';
        this.canvas.style.position = 'absolute';
        this.canvas2.style.position = 'absolute';
        $('#gradient').after(this.canvas, this.canvas2);
        return this;
    },
    events: function() { //event handlers
        $(window).on('resize', this.setSizes);
        $('#gradient').on('contentchange', this.draw2);
        return this;
    },
    setSizes: function() { // sets sizes on load and resize
        var self = gradSite,
            w    = $(window),
            m    = $('#gradient');

        self.canvas.height      = w.height();
        self.canvas.width       = w.width();
        self.canvas2.bg         = m.css('background-color');
        self.canvas2.height     = m.height();
        self.canvas2.width      = m.width();
        self.canvas2.style.top  = m.offset().top + 'px';
        self.canvas2.style.left = m.offset().left + 'px';
        self.draw2();
        return self;
    },
    colors: {
        colors: {
                0: [255,255,0],
                1: [255,170,0],
                2: [255,0,0]
        },
        map: {
                0: [0,0,1],
                1: [0,1,1],
                2: [0,1,1]
        },
        generate: function() { // generates the random colors
            var self = this;
            $.each(self.colors, function(i,color) {
                $.each(color, function(j, c) {
                    var r   = Math.random(),
                        r2  = Math.random(),
                        val = self.map[i][j] == 0 ? (c-(j+r)) : (c+(j+r2));

                    if (c > 255) self.map[i][j] = 0;
                    if (c < 0  ) self.map[i][j] = 1;

                    self.colors[i][j] = val;
                });
            });
        }
    },
    raf: (function() { // polyfill for requestAnimationFrame
        var lastTime = 0,
            vendors  = ['webkit', 'moz'];
        for(var x = 0; x < vendors.length && !window.requestAnimationFrame; ++x) {
            window.requestAnimationFrame = window[vendors[x]+'RequestAnimationFrame'];
            window.cancelAnimationFrame  = window[vendors[x]+'CancelAnimationFrame'] || window[vendors[x]+'CancelRequestAnimationFrame'];
        }

        if (!window.requestAnimationFrame)
            window.requestAnimationFrame = function(callback, element) {
                var currTime = new Date().getTime(),
                    timeToCall = Math.max(0, 16 - (currTime - lastTime)),
                    id = window.setTimeout(function() { callback(currTime + timeToCall); }, timeToCall);
                lastTime = currTime + timeToCall;
                return id;
            };

        if (!window.cancelAnimationFrame)
            window.cancelAnimationFrame = function(id) {
                clearTimeout(id);
            };
    }()),
    calculateColor: function(colors) { // returns a rgb color from the array
        return 'rgb(' + Math.round(colors[0]) + ',' + Math.round(colors[1]) + ',' + Math.round(colors[2]) + ')';
    },
    draw: function() { //draws the color background
        var self = this,
            c    = self.canvas || document.getElementById('canvas1'),
            ctx  = c.getContext('2d'),
            grad = ctx.createLinearGradient(0,0,0,self.canvas.height);

        c.width = c.width;
        grad.addColorStop(0, self.calculateColor(self.colors.colors[0]));
        grad.addColorStop(0.5, self.calculateColor(self.colors.colors[1]));
        grad.addColorStop(1, self.calculateColor(self.colors.colors[2]));
        ctx.fillStyle = grad;
        ctx.fillRect(0,0,self.canvas.width, self.canvas.height);
        return self;
    },
    draw2: function() { // draws the black square and content
        var self = this,
            c    = self.canvas2 || document.getElementById('canvas2'),
            ctx2 = c.getContext('2d'),
            txt  = $('.text', '#gradient').first(),
            hbar = $('.h_bar', '#gradient').first(),
            vbar = $('.v_bar', '#gradient').first();

        c.width = c.width;
        ctx2.globalCompositeOperation = 'xor';

        ctx2.font = txt.css('font');
        ctx2.fillStyle = c.bg || '#000';
        ctx2.fillText(txt.text(), txt.offset().left, txt.offset().top);  

        ctx2.fillRect(hbar.position().left, hbar.position().top, hbar.width(),hbar.height());
        ctx2.fillRect(vbar.position().left, vbar.position().top, vbar.width(),vbar.height());
        ctx2.fillRect(0,0,c.width,c.height);
    }
}

The raf function would be the polyfill for requestAnimationFrame, and the two draw functions create the content in the canvas. It's really not that complicated.

We will call the above script inside a DOM ready handler, like so :

$(function() {
    gradSite.init(); // starts the canvas stuff
});

Adding all that up into a fiddle, and adding a few elements for demonstration purposes, it would look like THIS FIDDLE, and here's the finished ->

FULL SCREEN DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
+1 very slick ^_^ –  Martin Turjak May 18 '13 at 23:23
    
@MartinTurjak - Thanks ! –  adeneo May 19 '13 at 0:23
    
and images are already suggested Sadly no one has mentioned the image mentioned, I appericate the code for the CSS3 gradients but I find there pretty limited in terms of textures applying.. Do you know how you can edit your code to rotate though 5 images. I'll be very grateful. –  bybe May 19 '13 at 15:07
    
@bybe - Not sure what you mean, is it just to fade between images, like this FIDDLE, but with gradient images etc ? –  adeneo May 19 '13 at 15:31
    
Yep, so same concept but with images... so rather than using css gradients generated backgrounds, I want to use gradients that are made in photoshop and saved as as 5 images this way I can take advantage of extra effects such as lighting and textures, sorry for not stating this in my question.... so in short, great but how can this be done with a smooth rotation of 5 images. –  bybe May 19 '13 at 16:34

The only way I can see this working is if your black div has no background and is cut into sections that that each have a background. The company name area would need to have the same foreground color as the background for the rest of the div sections. Depending on your layout needs this might be fine.

For example, you could cut it into three sections and two images: enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Ya, thought as much but its not very clean. I'd imagine there must be a way of fetching background elements based on position or cordinates some how much I just have no idea and hoping that someone can suggest a route as such, +1 mind for a good answer. –  bybe May 13 '13 at 19:15

You can try combinig background-size and background-position with javascript:

setGradientSizes = function (el) {
var width = $(document).width() + 'px', height = $(document).height() + 'px';
$(el || '.gradient:not(body)').each(function () {
    var offset = $(this).offset();
    $(this).css('background-size', width + ' ' + height);
    $(this).css('background-position', (offset.left * -1) + 'px ' + (offset.top * -1) + 'px');
})};

Working example here -> jsbin

NOTES:

  • this is not 100% cross browser - background-size is supported in FF4.0+, IE9.0+, Opera 10.0+, Chrome 1.0+, Safari 3+.
  • For some older browsers you can try browser specific prefixes (like -moz-background-size) - my example does not cover that.
  • To reduce load flickering you can apply calculations at first and then add background gradient
share|improve this answer
    
That's absolutely fantastic and the kind of thing I want, rather than using gradients using CSS I'd like to use a selection of background images which I should of noted in my question, I'd like them to rotate from one to another, do you know how I could edit your code to allow a smooth transistion of 5 images that blend from one another, rather than CSS. –  bybe May 15 '13 at 23:07
    
@DamianKrawczyk nice script, +1 from me! I like the div moving up and down in your demo, kinda mesmerizing ;-) –  Martin Turjak May 16 '13 at 8:36
    
... and to bybe's additional question, for example something like jquery animations with opacity: "toggle" (maybe something along this lines: .animate({opacity:"toggle"},{duration:"slow"});) would be one way to get the same blending effect as I did with keyframe animations in my answer, If you don't want to use the images in css as background images you can just use an img tab in your html positioned in the background, you could use $("img").attr('src', 'gradient1.png'); to set the image resource if you want to do that dynamically. –  Martin Turjak May 16 '13 at 8:46
3  
Taking Damians setGradientSizes function I really quickly threw together a jsfiddle, that uses background-images on div tags (I just quickly added some additional divs and animate their opacity so that they blend with the background behind during animation - you could add another line that changes the background image of the hidden div if you want to use more than 2 gradients) ^_^ –  Martin Turjak May 16 '13 at 16:57

You could make the background of the image with the text black, then set the div's background color to rgba(0,0,0,0) making it transparent

share|improve this answer

This might be helpful for you according to my understanding

There is inherit to copy a certain value from a parent to its children, but there is no property the other way round (which would involve another selector to decide which style to revert).

You will have to revert style changes manually:

div { color: green; }

form div { color: red; }

form div div.content { color: green; }

If you have access to the markup, you can add several classes to style precisely what you need:

form div.sub { color: red; }

form div div.content { /* remains green */ }

Edit: The CSS Working Group is up to something:

div.content {
  all: default;
}
share|improve this answer

If I was you I'll duplicate the css and jquey, print it on a div on top of what ever and make the overflow hidden (like masking layers but with z-index).

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