Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Often when writing the scss for new at-breakpoints--also even breakpoints that do not change the layout, but nonetheless still change styles at those breakpoints--if I do not specify exactly as I did higher in the code, the at-breakpoint will not override the previous css. For example, if in the first instantiation of scss I write the layout for the header. If I write the header width, then next inside of it the nav, and inside of that the ul, and inside of that the li, etc. If I want to change it later, I can't just nest, for example, a li inside the header in order to change the font. I have to re-list the entire code as before to maintain the same order of specificity.

Am I missing a really obvious way around this?

An example might be:

#about {
        @include span-columns(24,24);
        #contain_about {
            section {
                @include span-columns(20,20);
            }
            #profiles {
                @include span-columns(20,20);
                .profile {
                    @include span-columns(20,20);
                    .expandInside {
                        @include span-columns(20,20);
                        .hgroupInside {
                            h1.description {
                                font-size: 1.25em;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

Just to change the font-size for that element.

share|improve this question
    
This is just how specificity works. You need to structure your CSS/SASS differently in order to make your base styles less specific, then you won't have to be so insanely specific to override them with media queries. In general it's a good guideline to make styles as LEAST specific as possible to avoid this problem. Nesting everything in SASS is really not always the wisest option because it can generate incredibly specific and messy css if you aren't careful. –  Ennui May 13 '13 at 20:06
    
Yeah, I guess that makes sense but is disappointing to hear. I was hoping for a way around it. One more question: sometimes I will just repeat several styles in the media query in order to change something, like font-size. As far as load-time, how much damage is that doing, and how much is it going to matter on a medium-sized site, for example? –  thesublimeobject May 13 '13 at 21:40
    
It's generally a good idea to keep your specificity as low as possible. The other thing that I do is keep breakpoints together within each module - rather than organizing by breakpoint. –  Eric M Suzanne May 13 '13 at 23:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.