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I have this problem of conversion with this code using c++11 standard:

#include<unordered_set>
struct B
{
   int x, y;
};

class A
{
   struct hash
   {
      std::size_t operator()( int* const a ) const
      {
         return std::hash<int>()( *a );
      }
   };

   struct equal_to
   {
      std::size_t operator()( int* const a, int* const b ) const
      {
         return std::equal_to<int>()( *a, *b );
      }
   };

   private:
      std::unordered_set< int*, hash, equal_to > set;

   public:
      void push( const B& b )
      {
         set.insert( &b.x );
      }
};

Anyone know why is that? I can I solve the problem removing the "const" modifier in the argument of "push". But I don't want it because argument "b" isn't modified.

Edit.: My simplification of code has produced a unreferenced adress. I've make a struct B remove it.

share|improve this question
    
This is not C11. –  Bartek Banachewicz May 13 '13 at 19:02
2  
Voting to reopen. The problem is in set.insert(&a), where a has type const int&. The address of a has type "pointer to const int", but the set object is looking for a "pointer to (modifiable) int". That kind of const confusion is quite common, and warrants an answer. –  Pete Becker May 13 '13 at 19:06
2  
Unrelated to your question, but you are storing the address of an object that may be a temporary object in your set. Once the a that was passed to the push method has gone out of scope the address is invalid and could lead to heap corruption or application crashes later if it is referenced (by say your equal_to method). –  pstrjds May 13 '13 at 19:08
    
Exactly what problem are you having? Is there an error message? If so, what is it? –  Keith Thompson May 13 '13 at 19:32
    
The unrelated question: is there any important difference in passing int by value and passing int by const ref? –  maverik May 13 '13 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

The key of the set is declared as being a pointer-to-int, an int*. But this:

void push( const B& b )
{
    set.insert( &b.x );
}

is passing the address of a constant int, an int const*, hence the compiler error.

Removing the const from the argument would resolve the compiler error, as would making the key type an int const*, but both these solutions would:

  • permit some other part of the program, with non-const access to a B instance that was passed to push(), to change a value of one of the keys within the set and break the set invariant:

    A a;
    
    B b1{17, 22};
    B b2{30, 22};
    
    a.push(b1);
    a.push(b2);
    
    b1.x = 30;  // set no longer contains unique keys.
    
  • introduce a dependency of the set on the lifetime of the object referenced by b:

    A a;
    a.push({14, 23}); // a now contains a dangling pointer.
    

The safest solution is to store an int as the key, see http://ideone.com/KrykZw for online demo (thanks to bitmask for comment).


Possible solutions:

  1. Dynamically copy b.x. Or,
  2. Use int const* as the key. Or preferably (avoiding explicit dynamic allocation),
  3. Use int as the key, instead of an int* (see http://ideone.com/KrykZw)
share|improve this answer
    
Storing an int* in a (hash-)set (or a regular set for that matter), while allowing the pointed-to-object to change and having the hash function compute the hash based on the pointed-to-object, will not only exhibit undefined behaviour but also quite certainly crash in any implementation I can think of. Your 3rd solution is the only one that makes sense. (Note that b.x might change even if b is passed as const ref into push.) –  bitmask May 13 '13 at 20:03
    
Thanks, 2 option is my favourite solution because I don't want to use copy-constructor. –  jefebrondem May 13 '13 at 20:15
    
@jefebrondem, what copy constructor? –  hmjd May 13 '13 at 20:29

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