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I have a class that takes a bool template parameter. The class will have several methods which I need to specialize on the class bool template parameter. Is there a way of doing this without specialising the whole class itself?

Foo::bar() below is an example of what I mean, it does not work since std::is_same works with types and not values

Thanks.

template<bool Mode>
class Foo
{   
public:
template<bool M=Mode, typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<M,true>::value>::type * = 0>
void bar()
{
    std::cout << "true" << std::endl;
}

template<bool M=Mode, typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<M,false>::value>::type * = 0>
void bar()
{
    std::cout << "false" << std::endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
std::is_same compares types. M is a constant, true and false are values, i.e. they're not types. –  dyp May 13 '13 at 19:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need to use std::is_same. std::enable_if already takes a boolean parameter:

template <bool Mode>
class Foo
{   
    public:
        template <bool M = Mode, typename std::enable_if<M>::type* = nullptr>
        void bar()
        {
            std::cout << "true" << std::endl;
        }

        template <bool M = Mode, typename std::enable_if<!M>::type* = nullptr>
        void bar()
        {
            std::cout << "false" << std::endl;
        }
};

Here is a demo.

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Maybe I am missing something, but why not use plain good old specialization?

template <bool M>
struct base_template {
   void bar();
};

template <>
inline void base_template<true>::bar() { std::cout << "true\n"; }
template <>
inline void base_template<false>::bar() { std::cout << "false\n"; }
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I guess I could. I thought that if I want to specialize a class, I would have to reimplement all methods again in the specialized class, I see that this is not the case. That said, I think the enable_if code looks cleaner and is more understable since the declaration of the function declares the intent to specialize also. –  MK. May 13 '13 at 20:02
    
@MK.: Does it? You are creating different overloads, that while they can magically dissapear through SFINAE you have to be careful on the conditions that you use (i.e. the SFINAE check must provide disjoint sets of arguments or you get ambiguity errors). At the same time because they are unrelated base templates, there is nothing binding one interface to the other, so you can mistake the arguments/return value in one of the definitions... that is not specialization, but overloading. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 13 '13 at 20:21

You're on the right track. Just use the template parameter directly:

template<bool M=Mode, typename std::enable_if<M == true>::type * = 0>
void bar()                                 //^^^^^^^^^^
{
    std::cout << "true" << std::endl;
}
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